Gene order and dynamic domains. Kosak, S. T and Groudine, M. Science, 306(5696):644–647, 2004.
doi  abstract   bibtex   
When considering the daunting complexity of eukaryotic genomes, some comfort can be found in the fact that the human genome may contain only 30,000 to 40,000 genes. Moreover, growing evidence suggests that genomes may be organized in such a way as to take advantage of space. A gene's location in the linear DNA sequence and its position in the three-dimensional nucleus can both be important in its regulation. Contrary to prevailing notions in this postgenomic era, the bacteriophage lambda, a paragon of simplicity, may still have a few things to teach us with respect to these facets of nonrandom genomes.
@Article{kosak04gene,
  author    = {Steven T Kosak and Mark Groudine},
  title     = {Gene order and dynamic domains.},
  journal   = {Science},
  year      = {2004},
  volume    = {306},
  number    = {5696},
  pages     = {644--647},
  abstract  = {When considering the daunting complexity of eukaryotic genomes, some comfort can be found in the fact that the human genome may contain only 30,000 to 40,000 genes. Moreover, growing evidence suggests that genomes may be organized in such a way as to take advantage of space. A gene's location in the linear DNA sequence and its position in the three-dimensional nucleus can both be important in its regulation. Contrary to prevailing notions in this postgenomic era, the bacteriophage lambda, a paragon of simplicity, may still have a few things to teach us with respect to these facets of nonrandom genomes.},
  doi       = {10.1126/science.1103864},
  keywords  = {gene order; gene clusters; genome rearrangement; high-rank; high impact},
  owner     = {Sebastian},
  pmid      = {15499009},
  timestamp = {2012.04.14},
}
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