Geodetic evidence for a buoyant mantle plume beneath the Eifel volcanic area, NW Europe. Kreemer, C., Blewitt, G., & Davis, P. M 222(2):1316–1332.
Geodetic evidence for a buoyant mantle plume beneath the Eifel volcanic area, NW Europe [link]Paper  doi  abstract   bibtex   
SUMMARY The volcanism of the Eifel volcanic field (EVF), in west-central Germany, is often considered an example of hotspot volcanism given its geochemical signature and the putative mantle plume imaged underneath. EVF's setting in a stable continental area provides a rare natural laboratory to image surface deformation and test the hypothesis of there being a thermally buoyant plume. Here we use Global Positioning System (GPS) data to robustly image vertical land motion (VLM) and horizontal strain rates over most of intraplate Europe. We find a spatially coherent positive VLM anomaly over an area much larger than the EVF and with a maximum uplift of ∼1 mm yr−1 at the EVF (when corrected for glacial isostatic adjustment). This rate is considerably higher than averaged over the Late-Quaternary. Over the same area that uplifts, we find significant horizontal extension surrounded by a radial pattern of shortening, a superposition that strongly suggests a common dynamic cause. Besides the Eifel, no other area in NW Europe shows significant positive VLM coupled with extensional strain rates, except for the much broader region of glacial isostatic adjustment. We refer to this 3-D deformation anomaly as the Eifel Anomaly. We also find an extensional strain rate anomaly near the Massif Central volcanic field surrounded by radial shortening, but we do not detect a significant positive VLM signal there. The fact that the Eifel Anomaly is located above the Eifel plume suggests that the plume causes the anomaly. Indeed, we show that buoyancy forces induced by the plume at the bottom of the lithosphere can explain this remarkable surface deformation. Plume-induced deformation can also explain the relatively high rate of regional seismicity, particularly along the Lower Rhine Embayment.
@article{kreemer_geodetic_2020,
	title = {Geodetic evidence for a buoyant mantle plume beneath the Eifel volcanic area, {NW} Europe},
	volume = {222},
	issn = {0956-540X, 1365-246X},
	url = {https://academic.oup.com/gji/article/222/2/1316/5835686},
	doi = {10.1093/gji/ggaa227},
	abstract = {{SUMMARY}
            The volcanism of the Eifel volcanic field ({EVF}), in west-central Germany, is often considered an example of hotspot volcanism given its geochemical signature and the putative mantle plume imaged underneath. {EVF}'s setting in a stable continental area provides a rare natural laboratory to image surface deformation and test the hypothesis of there being a thermally buoyant plume. Here we use Global Positioning System ({GPS}) data to robustly image vertical land motion ({VLM}) and horizontal strain rates over most of intraplate Europe. We find a spatially coherent positive {VLM} anomaly over an area much larger than the {EVF} and with a maximum uplift of ∼1 mm yr−1 at the {EVF} (when corrected for glacial isostatic adjustment). This rate is considerably higher than averaged over the Late-Quaternary. Over the same area that uplifts, we find significant horizontal extension surrounded by a radial pattern of shortening, a superposition that strongly suggests a common dynamic cause. Besides the Eifel, no other area in {NW} Europe shows significant positive {VLM} coupled with extensional strain rates, except for the much broader region of glacial isostatic adjustment. We refer to this 3-D deformation anomaly as the Eifel Anomaly. We also find an extensional strain rate anomaly near the Massif Central volcanic field surrounded by radial shortening, but we do not detect a significant positive {VLM} signal there. The fact that the Eifel Anomaly is located above the Eifel plume suggests that the plume causes the anomaly. Indeed, we show that buoyancy forces induced by the plume at the bottom of the lithosphere can explain this remarkable surface deformation. Plume-induced deformation can also explain the relatively high rate of regional seismicity, particularly along the Lower Rhine Embayment.},
	pages = {1316--1332},
	number = {2},
	journaltitle = {Geophysical Journal International},
	author = {Kreemer, Corné and Blewitt, Geoffrey and Davis, Paul M},
	urldate = {2020-10-19},
	date = {2020-08-01},
	langid = {english},
	file = {Texte intégral:C\:\\Users\\ilico\\Zotero\\storage\\H7MUCXQ4\\Kreemer et al. - 2020 - Geodetic evidence for a buoyant mantle plume benea.pdf:application/pdf}
}
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