Molecular and Physiological Responses of Trees to Waterlogging Stress. Kreuzwieser, J. and Rennenberg, H.
Molecular and Physiological Responses of Trees to Waterlogging Stress [link]Paper  doi  abstract   bibtex   
One major effect of global climate change will be altered precipitation patterns in many regions of the world. This will cause a higher probability of long-term waterlogging in winter/spring and flash floods in summer because of extreme rainfall events. Particularly, trees not adapted at their natural site to such waterlogging stress can be impaired. Despite the enormous economic, ecological and social importance of forest ecosystems, the effect of waterlogging on trees is far less understood than the effect on many crops or the model plant Arabidopsis. There is only a handful of studies available investigating the transcriptome and metabolome of waterlogged trees. Main physiological responses of trees to waterlogging include the stimulation of fermentative pathways and an accelerated glycolytic flux. Many energy-consuming, anabolic processes are slowed down to overcome the energy crisis mediated by waterlogging. A crucial feature of waterlogging tolerance is the steady supply of glycolysis with carbohydrates, particularly in the roots; stress-sensitive trees fail to maintain sufficient carbohydrate availability resulting in the dieback of the stressed tissues. The present review summarizes physiological and molecular features of waterlogging tolerance of trees; the focus is on carbon metabolism in both, leaves and roots of trees.
@article{kreuzwieserMolecularPhysiologicalResponses2014,
  title = {Molecular and Physiological Responses of Trees to Waterlogging Stress},
  author = {Kreuzwieser, Jürgen and Rennenberg, Heinz},
  date = {2014-05},
  journaltitle = {Plant, Cell \& Environment},
  pages = {n/a},
  issn = {0140-7791},
  doi = {10.1111/pce.12310},
  url = {https://doi.org/10.1111/pce.12310},
  abstract = {One major effect of global climate change will be altered precipitation patterns in many regions of the world. This will cause a higher probability of long-term waterlogging in winter/spring and flash floods in summer because of extreme rainfall events. Particularly, trees not adapted at their natural site to such waterlogging stress can be impaired. Despite the enormous economic, ecological and social importance of forest ecosystems, the effect of waterlogging on trees is far less understood than the effect on many crops or the model plant Arabidopsis. There is only a handful of studies available investigating the transcriptome and metabolome of waterlogged trees. Main physiological responses of trees to waterlogging include the stimulation of fermentative pathways and an accelerated glycolytic flux. Many energy-consuming, anabolic processes are slowed down to overcome the energy crisis mediated by waterlogging. A crucial feature of waterlogging tolerance is the steady supply of glycolysis with carbohydrates, particularly in the roots; stress-sensitive trees fail to maintain sufficient carbohydrate availability resulting in the dieback of the stressed tissues. The present review summarizes physiological and molecular features of waterlogging tolerance of trees; the focus is on carbon metabolism in both, leaves and roots of trees.},
  keywords = {*imported-from-citeulike-INRMM,~INRMM-MiD:c-13778296,~to-add-doi-URL,acer-campestre,acer-platanoides,acer-pseudoplatanus,alnus-glutinosa,betula-spp,carpinus-betulus,fagus-sylvatica,floods,forest-resources,fraxinus-excelsior,juglans-regia,malus-sylvestris,pinus-sylvestris,platanus-spp,populus-balsamifera,populus-nigra,prunus-avium,quercus-robur,robinia-pseudoacacia,salix-alba,tilia-spp,tolerance,ulmus-minor,water-resources}
}
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