A review of scientific research and recommendations regarding eggs. Kritchevsky, S. B. Journal of the American College of Nutrition, 23(sup6):596S–600S, 2004.
A review of scientific research and recommendations regarding eggs [link]Paper  doi  abstract   bibtex   
For much of the past 40 years, the public has been warned away from eggs because of a concern over coronary heart disease risk. This concern is based on three observations: 1. eggs are a rich source of dietary cholesterol; 2. when fed experimentally, dietary cholesterol increases serum cholesterol and; 3. high serum cholesterol predicts the onset of coronary heart disease. However, data from free-living populations show that egg consumption is not associated with higher cholesterol levels. Furthermore, as a whole, the epidemiologic literature does not support the idea that egg consumption is a risk factor for coronary disease. Within the nutritional community there is a growing appreciation that health derives from an overall pattern of diet rather than from the avoidance of particular foods, and there has been a shift in the tone in recent dietary recommendations away from “avoidance” messages to ones that promote healthy eating patterns. The most recent American Heart Association guidelines no longer include a recommendation to limit egg consumption, but recommend the adoption of eating practices associated with good health. Based on the epidemiologic evidence, there is no reason to think that such a healthy eating pattern could not include eggs.
@article{kritchevsky_review_2004,
	title = {A review of scientific research and recommendations regarding eggs},
	volume = {23},
	issn = {0731-5724},
	url = {https://doi.org/10.1080/07315724.2004.10719429},
	doi = {10.1080/07315724.2004.10719429},
	abstract = {For much of the past 40 years, the public has been warned away from eggs because of a concern over coronary heart disease risk. This concern is based on three observations: 1. eggs are a rich source of dietary cholesterol; 2. when fed experimentally, dietary cholesterol increases serum cholesterol and; 3. high serum cholesterol predicts the onset of coronary heart disease. However, data from free-living populations show that egg consumption is not associated with higher cholesterol levels. Furthermore, as a whole, the epidemiologic literature does not support the idea that egg consumption is a risk factor for coronary disease. Within the nutritional community there is a growing appreciation that health derives from an overall pattern of diet rather than from the avoidance of particular foods, and there has been a shift in the tone in recent dietary recommendations away from “avoidance” messages to ones that promote healthy eating patterns. The most recent American Heart Association guidelines no longer include a recommendation to limit egg consumption, but recommend the adoption of eating practices associated with good health. Based on the epidemiologic evidence, there is no reason to think that such a healthy eating pattern could not include eggs.},
	number = {sup6},
	urldate = {2019-11-08},
	journal = {Journal of the American College of Nutrition},
	author = {Kritchevsky, Stephen B.},
	year = {2004},
	keywords = {CHD = coronary heart disease, RR = relative risk, coronary disease, eggs, guidelines, nutrition},
	pages = {596S--600S},
}
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