Assessing and Managing the Current and Future Pest Risk from Water Hyacinth, (Eichhornia Crassipes), an Invasive Aquatic Plant Threatening the Environment and Water Security. Kriticos, D. J. and Brunel, S. 11(8):e0120054+.
Assessing and Managing the Current and Future Pest Risk from Water Hyacinth, (Eichhornia Crassipes), an Invasive Aquatic Plant Threatening the Environment and Water Security [link]Paper  doi  abstract   bibtex   
Understanding and managing the biological invasion threats posed by aquatic plants under current and future climates is a growing challenge for biosecurity and land management agencies worldwide. Eichhornia crassipes is one of the world's worst aquatic weeds. Presently, it threatens aquatic ecosystems, and hinders the management and delivery of freshwater services in both developed and developing parts of the world. A niche model was fitted using CLIMEX, to estimate the potential distribution of E. crassipes under historical and future climate scenarios. Under two future greenhouse gas emission scenarios for 2080 simulated with three Global Climate Models, the area with a favourable temperature regime appears set to shift polewards. The greatest potential for future range expansion lies in Europe. Elsewhere in the northern hemisphere temperature gradients are too steep for significant geographical range expansion under the climate scenarios explored here. In the Southern Hemisphere, the southern range boundary for E. crassipes is set to expand southwards in Argentina, Australia and New Zealand; under current climate conditions it is already able to invade the southern limits of Africa. The opportunity exists to prevent its spread into the islands of Tasmania in Australia and the South Island of New Zealand, both of which depend upon hydroelectric facilities that would be threatened by the presence of E. crassipes. In Europe, efforts to slow or stop the spread of E. crassipes will face the challenge of limited internal biosecurity capacity. The modelling technique demonstrated here is the first application of niche modelling for an aquatic weed under historical and projected future climates. It provides biosecurity agencies with a spatial tool to foresee and manage the emerging invasion threats in a manner that can be included in the international standard for pest risk assessments. It should also support more detailed local and regional management.
@article{kriticosAssessingManagingCurrent2016,
  title = {Assessing and Managing the Current and Future Pest Risk from Water Hyacinth, ({{Eichhornia}} Crassipes), an Invasive Aquatic Plant Threatening the Environment and Water Security},
  author = {Kriticos, Darren J. and Brunel, Sarah},
  date = {2016-08},
  journaltitle = {PLoS ONE},
  volume = {11},
  pages = {e0120054+},
  issn = {1932-6203},
  doi = {10.1371/journal.pone.0120054},
  url = {https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0120054},
  abstract = {Understanding and managing the biological invasion threats posed by aquatic plants under current and future climates is a growing challenge for biosecurity and land management agencies worldwide. Eichhornia crassipes is one of the world's worst aquatic weeds. Presently, it threatens aquatic ecosystems, and hinders the management and delivery of freshwater services in both developed and developing parts of the world. A niche model was fitted using CLIMEX, to estimate the potential distribution of E. crassipes under historical and future climate scenarios. Under two future greenhouse gas emission scenarios for 2080 simulated with three Global Climate Models, the area with a favourable temperature regime appears set to shift polewards. The greatest potential for future range expansion lies in Europe. Elsewhere in the northern hemisphere temperature gradients are too steep for significant geographical range expansion under the climate scenarios explored here. In the Southern Hemisphere, the southern range boundary for E. crassipes is set to expand southwards in Argentina, Australia and New Zealand; under current climate conditions it is already able to invade the southern limits of Africa. The opportunity exists to prevent its spread into the islands of Tasmania in Australia and the South Island of New Zealand, both of which depend upon hydroelectric facilities that would be threatened by the presence of E. crassipes. In Europe, efforts to slow or stop the spread of E. crassipes will face the challenge of limited internal biosecurity capacity. The modelling technique demonstrated here is the first application of niche modelling for an aquatic weed under historical and projected future climates. It provides biosecurity agencies with a spatial tool to foresee and manage the emerging invasion threats in a manner that can be included in the international standard for pest risk assessments. It should also support more detailed local and regional management.},
  keywords = {*imported-from-citeulike-INRMM,~INRMM-MiD:c-14124608,~to-add-doi-URL,eichhornia-crassipes,plant-pests,risk-assessment,risk-management,water-resources,water-security},
  number = {8}
}
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