Invasive Alien Species in the Food Chain: Advancing Risk Assessment Models to Address Climate Change, Economics and Uncertainty. Kriticos, D. J., Venette, R. C., Koch, F. H., Rafoss, T., Van der Werf, W., & Worner, S. 18:1–7.
Invasive Alien Species in the Food Chain: Advancing Risk Assessment Models to Address Climate Change, Economics and Uncertainty [link]Paper  doi  abstract   bibtex   
[Excerpt] Economic globalization depends on the movement of people and goods between countries. As these exchanges increase, so does the potential for translocation of harmful pests, weeds, and pathogens capable of impacting our crops, livestock and natural resources (Hulme 2009), with concomitant impacts on global food security (Cook et al. 2011). [\n] Potential invasions by alien species create a dilemma for nations that engage in international trade. On one hand, free trade may provide new markets for producers, cheaper and more diverse goods for consumers, and increase overall gross domestic product. On the other hand, unfettered trade may allow new pests to arrive and jeopardize domestic agricultural industries. Pests may lower agricultural production, reduce the marketability of a crop, or trigger quarantine restrictions from other countries to prevent the continued spread of the pest. The challenge, then, is to identify the risks associated with particular organisms, commodities, or pathways and mitigate those risks to desirable levels. Pest risk assessment, the process by which scientific evidence is used to assess the likelihood that a pest might invade and the extent of harm should the invasion be successful, is commonly applied to decide whether to engage in agricultural trade with another nation and whether phytosanitary precautions might be required in order to manage the risks (Magarey et al. 2009, Schrader et al. 2010). When conducted properly, risk assessments can avert economic losses and preserve economic activity (Keller et al. 2007). [\n] Pest risk maps illustrate where invasive alien arthropods, molluscs, pathogens, and weeds might become established, spread, and cause harm to natural and agricultural resources within a pest risk area. Such maps can be powerful tools to assist policymakers in matters of international trade, domestic quarantines, biosecurity surveillance, or pest-incursion responses. The International Pest Risk Mapping Workgroup (IPRMW) is a group of ecologists, economists, modellers, and practising risk analysts who are committed to improving the methods used to estimate risks posed by invasive alien species to agricultural and natural resources. The group also strives to improve communication about pest risks to biosecurity, production, and natural-resource-sector stakeholders so that risks can be better managed. The IPRMW previously identified ten activities to improve pest risk assessment procedures, among these were: ” improve representations of uncertainty, … expand communications with decision-makers on the interpretation and use of risk maps, … increase international collaboration, … incorporate climate change, … [.and] study how human and biological dimensions interact” (Venette et al. 2010). [\n] The IPRMWmet in Tromsø, Norway from 23-26 July, 2012 to address the specific challenges of incorporating climate change into long-term risk projections for invasive alien species, estimating the economic effects of species invasions, and incorporating uncertainty in risk models. A special symposium focused on the interface between pest risk science and policy. The meeting was attended by 30 ecologists, economists, risk analysts and policy advisors from Australia, New Zealand, Canada, the United Kingdom, Finland, Norway, the Netherlands, Hungary, France, Italy, and the United States. The conference succeeded in stimulating new ideas about how to incorporate climate change, invasion dynamics, economics, and uncertainty into pest risk models and maps for invasive alien species, and how to communicate these improved results to biosecurity policy advisors.This special issue of NeoBiota documents the proceedings of the meeting, and this overview summarizes major findings. [...]
@article{kriticosInvasiveAlienSpecies2013,
  title = {Invasive Alien Species in the Food Chain: Advancing Risk Assessment Models to Address Climate Change, Economics and Uncertainty},
  author = {Kriticos, Darren J. and Venette, Rob C. and Koch, Frank H. and Rafoss, Trond and Van der Werf, Wopke and Worner, Sue},
  date = {2013-09},
  journaltitle = {NeoBiota},
  volume = {18},
  pages = {1--7},
  issn = {1314-2488},
  doi = {10.3897/neobiota.18.6108},
  url = {https://doi.org/10.3897/neobiota.18.6108},
  abstract = {[Excerpt] Economic globalization depends on the movement of people and goods between countries. As these exchanges increase, so does the potential for translocation of harmful pests, weeds, and pathogens capable of impacting our crops, livestock and natural resources (Hulme 2009), with concomitant impacts on global food security (Cook et al. 2011).

[\textbackslash n] Potential invasions by alien species create a dilemma for nations that engage in international trade. On one hand, free trade may provide new markets for producers, cheaper and more diverse goods for consumers, and increase overall gross domestic product. On the other hand, unfettered trade may allow new pests to arrive and jeopardize domestic agricultural industries. Pests may lower agricultural production, reduce the marketability of a crop, or trigger quarantine restrictions from other countries to prevent the continued spread of the pest. The challenge, then, is to identify the risks associated with particular organisms, commodities, or pathways and mitigate those risks to desirable levels. Pest risk assessment, the process by which scientific evidence is used to assess the likelihood that a pest might invade and the extent of harm should the invasion be successful, is commonly applied to decide whether to engage in agricultural trade with another nation and whether phytosanitary precautions might be required in order to manage the risks (Magarey et al. 2009, Schrader et al. 2010). When conducted properly, risk assessments can avert economic losses and preserve economic activity (Keller et al. 2007).

[\textbackslash n] Pest risk maps illustrate where invasive alien arthropods, molluscs, pathogens, and weeds might become established, spread, and cause harm to natural and agricultural resources within a pest risk area. Such maps can be powerful tools to assist policymakers in matters of international trade, domestic quarantines, biosecurity surveillance, or pest-incursion responses. The International Pest Risk Mapping Workgroup (IPRMW) is a group of ecologists, economists, modellers, and practising risk analysts who are committed to improving the methods used to estimate risks posed by invasive alien species to agricultural and natural resources. The group also strives to improve communication about pest risks to biosecurity, production, and natural-resource-sector stakeholders so that risks can be better managed. The IPRMW previously identified ten activities to improve pest risk assessment procedures, among these were: ” improve representations of uncertainty, … expand communications with decision-makers on the interpretation and use of risk maps, … increase international collaboration, … incorporate climate change, … [.and] study how human and biological dimensions interact” (Venette et al. 2010).

[\textbackslash n] The IPRMWmet in Tromsø, Norway from 23-26 July, 2012 to address the specific challenges of incorporating climate change into long-term risk projections for invasive alien species, estimating the economic effects of species invasions, and incorporating uncertainty in risk models. A special symposium focused on the interface between pest risk science and policy. The meeting was attended by 30 ecologists, economists, risk analysts and policy advisors from Australia, New Zealand, Canada, the United Kingdom, Finland, Norway, the Netherlands, Hungary, France, Italy, and the United States. The conference succeeded in stimulating new ideas about how to incorporate climate change, invasion dynamics, economics, and uncertainty into pest risk models and maps for invasive alien species, and how to communicate these improved results to biosecurity policy advisors.This special issue of NeoBiota documents the proceedings of the meeting, and this overview summarizes major findings. [...]},
  keywords = {*imported-from-citeulike-INRMM,~INRMM-MiD:c-12855246,~to-add-doi-URL,climate-change,economic-impacts,featured-publication,food-security,plant-pests,risk-assessment,uncertainty,vegetation}
}
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