Alnus Spp. Genetic Resources Conservation Strategy. Krstinic, A., Gracan, J., & Kajba, D. In Turok, J., Eriksson, G., Russel, K., & Borelli, S., editors, Noble Hardwoods Network: Report of the Fourth Meeting, 4-6 September 1999, Gmunden, Austria and the Fifth Meeting, 17-19 May 2001, Blessington, Ireland, pages 44–49. Bioversity International.
Alnus Spp. Genetic Resources Conservation Strategy [link]Paper  abstract   bibtex   
Introduction The genus Alnus includes about 36 species mostly located in the Northern emisphere. Generally, alders grow in regions of floodplain forests, even though in the mountains of central Europe they occur along watercourses up to 2800 m a.s.l. Species of this genus grow either as bushes or high trees, showing great variability in their morphological and physiological properties. Black alder is becoming an increasingly interesting forest tree species due to its multiple uses both in the forestry and wood industry. It is known as a fast growing and meliorative species, which has the ability of fixing atmospheric nitrogen. Black alder stands with longer rotations can produce logs of very good quality for the timber industry, but in short rotation (cycles) in so-called special-purpose plantations it is very desirable for biomass production (Krstinič 1994). The basic function of these black alder plantations is a reduction of the pressure on natural forests of valuable hardwoods species (oak, beech, ash, maple), conservation of genetic resources and a beneficial effect on global climate changes. Owing to these characteristics, black alder proved to be very suitable for tree cultivation either in the form of pioneer plantations or in mixed plantations with other coniferous and deciduous tree species which grow better than in monocultural plantations (Hansen and Dawson 1982; Heilman and Stettler 1983; Krstinič and Komlenovič 1986). As the natural distribution of black alder is not compact but markedly disjunct and widely spread both in the horizontal and vertical directions, the natural populations of this species exist in different edaphic conditions, and it should be supposed that climatic, edaphic and altitudinal races are differentiated. This hypothesis is proved by the results of provenance research, which have shown very distinct genetic differences in survival and biomass production (Krstinič et al. 1992.). The genetic differences between provenances are found not only at the European level but also at a broader one. As a result, there is a need to protect existing biodiversity of natural populations and to spread the range of black alder by establishing plantations at suitable sites.
@incollection{krstinicAlnusSppGenetic2002,
  title = {Alnus Spp. Genetic Resources Conservation Strategy},
  booktitle = {Noble {{Hardwoods Network}}: {{Report}} of the {{Fourth Meeting}}, 4-6 {{September}} 1999, {{Gmunden}}, {{Austria}} and the {{Fifth Meeting}}, 17-19 {{May}} 2001, {{Blessington}}, {{Ireland}}},
  author = {Krstinic, A. and Gracan, J. and Kajba, D.},
  editor = {Turok, J. and Eriksson, G. and Russel, K. and Borelli, S.},
  date = {2002},
  pages = {44--49},
  publisher = {{Bioversity International}},
  url = {http://mfkp.org/INRMM/article/13620188},
  abstract = {Introduction

The genus Alnus includes about 36 species mostly located in the Northern emisphere. Generally, alders grow in regions of floodplain forests, even though in the mountains of central Europe they occur along watercourses up to 2800 m a.s.l. Species of this genus grow either as bushes or high trees, showing great variability in their morphological and physiological properties. Black alder is becoming an increasingly interesting forest tree species due to its multiple uses both in the forestry and wood industry. It is known as a fast growing and meliorative species, which has the ability of fixing atmospheric nitrogen. Black alder stands with longer rotations can produce logs of very good quality for the timber industry, but in short rotation (cycles) in so-called special-purpose plantations it is very desirable for biomass production (Krstinič 1994). The basic function of these black alder plantations is a reduction of the pressure on natural forests of valuable hardwoods species (oak, beech, ash, maple), conservation of genetic resources and a beneficial effect on global climate changes. Owing to these characteristics, black alder proved to be very suitable for tree cultivation either in the form of pioneer plantations or in mixed plantations with other coniferous and deciduous tree species which grow better than in monocultural plantations (Hansen and Dawson 1982; Heilman and Stettler 1983; Krstinič and Komlenovič 1986). As the natural distribution of black alder is not compact but markedly disjunct and widely spread both in the horizontal and vertical directions, the natural populations of this species exist in different edaphic conditions, and it should be supposed that climatic, edaphic and altitudinal races are differentiated. This hypothesis is proved by the results of provenance research, which have shown very distinct genetic differences in survival and biomass production (Krstinič et al. 1992.). The genetic differences between provenances are found not only at the European level but also at a broader one. As a result, there is a need to protect existing biodiversity of natural populations and to spread the range of black alder by establishing plantations at suitable sites.},
  isbn = {978-92-9043-496-2},
  keywords = {*imported-from-citeulike-INRMM,~INRMM-MiD:c-13620188,~to-add-stable-URL,alnus-glutinosa,conservation-strategies,genetic-resources}
}
Downloads: 0