Culturable Bacteria from Zn- and Cd-Accumulating Salix Caprea with Differential Effects on Plant Growth and Heavy Metal Availability. Kuffner, M., De Maria, S., Puschenreiter, M., Fallmann, K., Wieshammer, G., Gorfer, M., Strauss, J., Rivelli, A. R., & Sessitsch, A. 108(4):1471–1484.
Culturable Bacteria from Zn- and Cd-Accumulating Salix Caprea with Differential Effects on Plant Growth and Heavy Metal Availability [link]Paper  doi  abstract   bibtex   
Aims:  To characterize bacteria associated with Zn/Cd-accumulating Salix caprea regarding their potential to support heavy metal phytoextraction. Methods and Results:  Three different media allowed the isolation of 44 rhizosphere strains and 44 endophytes, resistant to Zn/Cd and mostly affiliated with Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria and Bacteroidetes/Chlorobi. 1-Aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid deaminase (ACCD), indole acetic acid and siderophore production were detected in 41, 23 and 50\,% of the rhizosphere isolates and in 9, 55 and 2\,% of the endophytes, respectively. Fifteen rhizosphere bacteria and five endophytes were further tested for the production of metal-mobilizing metabolites by extracting contaminated soil with filtrates from liquid cultures. Four Actinobacteria mobilized Zn and/or Cd. The other strains immobilized Cd or both metals. An ACCD- and siderophore-producing, Zn/Cd-immobilizing rhizosphere isolate (Burkholderia sp.) and a Zn/Cd-mobilizing Actinobacterium endophyte were inoculated onto S.~caprea. The rhizosphere isolate reduced metal uptake in roots, whereas the endophyte enhanced metal accumulation in leaves. Plant growth was not promoted. Conclusions:  Metal mobilization experiments predicted bacterial effects on S.~caprea more reliably than standard tests for plant growth-promoting activities. Significance and Impact of the Study:  Bacteria, particularly Actinobacteria, associated with heavy metal-accumulating Salix have the potential to increase metal uptake, which can be predicted by mobilization experiments and may be applicable in phytoremediation.
@article{kuffnerCulturableBacteriaZn2010,
  title = {Culturable Bacteria from {{Zn}}- and {{Cd}}-Accumulating {{Salix}} Caprea with Differential Effects on Plant Growth and Heavy Metal Availability},
  author = {Kuffner, M. and De Maria, S. and Puschenreiter, M. and Fallmann, K. and Wieshammer, G. and Gorfer, M. and Strauss, J. and Rivelli, A. R. and Sessitsch, A.},
  date = {2010-04},
  journaltitle = {Journal of Applied Microbiology},
  volume = {108},
  pages = {1471--1484},
  issn = {1364-5072},
  doi = {10.1111/j.1365-2672.2010.04670.x},
  url = {https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2672.2010.04670.x},
  abstract = {Aims:\hspace{0.6em} To characterize bacteria associated with Zn/Cd-accumulating Salix caprea regarding their potential to support heavy metal phytoextraction. Methods and Results:\hspace{0.6em} Three different media allowed the isolation of 44 rhizosphere strains and 44 endophytes, resistant to Zn/Cd and mostly affiliated with Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria and Bacteroidetes/Chlorobi. 1-Aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid deaminase (ACCD), indole acetic acid and siderophore production were detected in 41, 23 and 50\,\% of the rhizosphere isolates and in 9, 55 and 2\,\% of the endophytes, respectively. Fifteen rhizosphere bacteria and five endophytes were further tested for the production of metal-mobilizing metabolites by extracting contaminated soil with filtrates from liquid cultures. Four Actinobacteria mobilized Zn and/or Cd. The other strains immobilized Cd or both metals. An ACCD- and siderophore-producing, Zn/Cd-immobilizing rhizosphere isolate (Burkholderia sp.) and a Zn/Cd-mobilizing Actinobacterium endophyte were inoculated onto S.~caprea. The rhizosphere isolate reduced metal uptake in roots, whereas the endophyte enhanced metal accumulation in leaves. Plant growth was not promoted. Conclusions:\hspace{0.6em} Metal mobilization experiments predicted bacterial effects on S.~caprea more reliably than standard tests for plant growth-promoting activities. Significance and Impact of the Study:\hspace{0.6em} Bacteria, particularly Actinobacteria, associated with heavy metal-accumulating Salix have the potential to increase metal uptake, which can be predicted by mobilization experiments and may be applicable in phytoremediation.},
  keywords = {*imported-from-citeulike-INRMM,~INRMM-MiD:c-6854970,heavy-metals,physiology,salix-caprea},
  number = {4}
}
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