Culturable Bacteria from Zn- and Cd-Accumulating Salix Caprea with Differential Effects on Plant Growth and Heavy Metal Availability. Kuffner, M.; De Maria, S.; Puschenreiter, M.; Fallmann, K.; Wieshammer, G.; Gorfer, M.; Strauss, J.; Rivelli, A. R.; and Sessitsch, A. 108(4):1471–1484.
Culturable Bacteria from Zn- and Cd-Accumulating Salix Caprea with Differential Effects on Plant Growth and Heavy Metal Availability [link]Paper  doi  abstract   bibtex   
Aims:  To characterize bacteria associated with Zn/Cd-accumulating Salix caprea regarding their potential to support heavy metal phytoextraction. Methods and Results:  Three different media allowed the isolation of 44 rhizosphere strains and 44 endophytes, resistant to Zn/Cd and mostly affiliated with Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria and Bacteroidetes/Chlorobi. 1-Aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid deaminase (ACCD), indole acetic acid and siderophore production were detected in 41, 23 and 50\,% of the rhizosphere isolates and in 9, 55 and 2\,% of the endophytes, respectively. Fifteen rhizosphere bacteria and five endophytes were further tested for the production of metal-mobilizing metabolites by extracting contaminated soil with filtrates from liquid cultures. Four Actinobacteria mobilized Zn and/or Cd. The other strains immobilized Cd or both metals. An ACCD- and siderophore-producing, Zn/Cd-immobilizing rhizosphere isolate (Burkholderia sp.) and a Zn/Cd-mobilizing Actinobacterium endophyte were inoculated onto S.~caprea. The rhizosphere isolate reduced metal uptake in roots, whereas the endophyte enhanced metal accumulation in leaves. Plant growth was not promoted. Conclusions:  Metal mobilization experiments predicted bacterial effects on S.~caprea more reliably than standard tests for plant growth-promoting activities. Significance and Impact of the Study:  Bacteria, particularly Actinobacteria, associated with heavy metal-accumulating Salix have the potential to increase metal uptake, which can be predicted by mobilization experiments and may be applicable in phytoremediation.
@article{kuffnerCulturableBacteriaZn2010,
  title = {Culturable Bacteria from {{Zn}}- and {{Cd}}-Accumulating {{Salix}} Caprea with Differential Effects on Plant Growth and Heavy Metal Availability},
  author = {Kuffner, M. and De Maria, S. and Puschenreiter, M. and Fallmann, K. and Wieshammer, G. and Gorfer, M. and Strauss, J. and Rivelli, A. R. and Sessitsch, A.},
  date = {2010-04},
  journaltitle = {Journal of Applied Microbiology},
  volume = {108},
  pages = {1471--1484},
  issn = {1364-5072},
  doi = {10.1111/j.1365-2672.2010.04670.x},
  url = {https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2672.2010.04670.x},
  abstract = {Aims:\hspace{0.6em} To characterize bacteria associated with Zn/Cd-accumulating Salix caprea regarding their potential to support heavy metal phytoextraction. Methods and Results:\hspace{0.6em} Three different media allowed the isolation of 44 rhizosphere strains and 44 endophytes, resistant to Zn/Cd and mostly affiliated with Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria and Bacteroidetes/Chlorobi. 1-Aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid deaminase (ACCD), indole acetic acid and siderophore production were detected in 41, 23 and 50\,\% of the rhizosphere isolates and in 9, 55 and 2\,\% of the endophytes, respectively. Fifteen rhizosphere bacteria and five endophytes were further tested for the production of metal-mobilizing metabolites by extracting contaminated soil with filtrates from liquid cultures. Four Actinobacteria mobilized Zn and/or Cd. The other strains immobilized Cd or both metals. An ACCD- and siderophore-producing, Zn/Cd-immobilizing rhizosphere isolate (Burkholderia sp.) and a Zn/Cd-mobilizing Actinobacterium endophyte were inoculated onto S.~caprea. The rhizosphere isolate reduced metal uptake in roots, whereas the endophyte enhanced metal accumulation in leaves. Plant growth was not promoted. Conclusions:\hspace{0.6em} Metal mobilization experiments predicted bacterial effects on S.~caprea more reliably than standard tests for plant growth-promoting activities. Significance and Impact of the Study:\hspace{0.6em} Bacteria, particularly Actinobacteria, associated with heavy metal-accumulating Salix have the potential to increase metal uptake, which can be predicted by mobilization experiments and may be applicable in phytoremediation.},
  keywords = {*imported-from-citeulike-INRMM,~INRMM-MiD:c-6854970,heavy-metals,physiology,salix-caprea},
  number = {4}
}
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