Structure and Evolution of Blogspace. Kumar, R.; Novak, J.; Raghavan, P.; and Tomkins, A. Communications of the ACM, 47(12):35-39, December, 2004.
doi  abstract   bibtex   
Blogs constitute a remarkable artifact of the Web. Most people think of them as Web pages with reverse chronological sequences of dated entries, usually with sidebars of profile information and usually maintained and published with the help of a popular blog authoring tool. They tend to be quirky, highly personal, typically read by repeat visitors, and interwoven into a network of tight-knit but active communities. We refer to the collection of blogs and all their links as blogspace. By analyzing the structure and content of more than one million blogs worldwide, we've now unearthed some fascinating insights into blogger behavior.
@article{ kum04,
  author = {Ravi Kumar and Jasmine Novak and Prabhakar Raghavan and Andrew Tomkins},
  title = {Structure and Evolution of Blogspace},
  journal = {Communications of the ACM},
  year = {2004},
  month = {December},
  volume = {47},
  number = {12},
  pages = {35-39},
  doi = {10.1145/1035134.1035162},
  uri = {http://portal.acm.org/citation.cfm?doid=1035134.1035162},
  uri = {http://brain.hastypastry.net/blogosphere/blogosphere_structure_and_evolution.pdf},
  abstract = {Blogs constitute a remarkable artifact of the Web. Most people think of them as Web pages with reverse chronological sequences of dated entries, usually with sidebars of profile information and usually maintained and published with the help of a popular blog authoring tool. They tend to be quirky, highly personal, typically read by repeat visitors, and interwoven into a network of tight-knit but active communities. We refer to the collection of blogs and all their links as blogspace. By analyzing the structure and content of more than one million blogs worldwide, we've now unearthed some fascinating insights into blogger behavior.}
}
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