Ten Steps to a Results-Based Monitoring and Evaluation System. A Handbook for Development Practitioners. Kusek, J and Rist, R The World Bank, Washington D.C., 2004.
Ten Steps to a Results-Based Monitoring and Evaluation System. A Handbook for Development Practitioners. [link]Paper  abstract   bibtex   
Technical / Tactical. intro While the role of the state has changed and evolved during recent history, it is now readily apparent that good governance is key to achieving sustainable socioeconomic development. States are being challenged as never before by the demands of the global economy, new information and technology, and calls for greater participation and democracy. Governments and organizations all over the world are grappling with internal and external demands and pressures for improvements and reforms in public management. These demands come from a variety of sources including multilateral development institutions, donor governments, parliaments, the private sector, NGOs, citizens’ groups and civil society, the media, and so forth. Whether it is calls for greater accountability and transparency, enhanced effectiveness of development programs in exchange for foreign aid, or real results of political promises made, governments and organizations must be increasingly responsive to internal and external stakeholders to demonstrate tangible results. “The clamor for greater government effectiveness has reached crisis proportions in many developing countries where the state has failed to deliver even such fundamental public goods as property rights, roads, and basic health and education” (World Bank 1997, p. 2). In short, government performance has now become a global phenomenon. Results-based monitoring and evaluation (M&E) is a powerful public management tool that can be used to help policymakers and decisionmakers track progress and demonstrate the impact of a given project, program, or policy. Results-based M&E differs from traditional implementation-focused M&E in that it moves beyond an emphasis on inputs and outputs to a greater focus on outcomes and impacts. etc
@book{kusek_ten_2004,
	address = {Washington D.C.},
	title = {Ten {Steps} to a {Results}-{Based} {Monitoring} and {Evaluation} {System}. {A} {Handbook} for {Development} {Practitioners}.},
	shorttitle = {Ten {Steps} to a {Results}-{Based} {Monitoring} and {Evaluation} {System}. {A} {Handbook} for {Development} {Practitioners}.},
	url = {http://documents.worldbank.org/curated/en/2004/01/5068054/handbook-development-practitioners-ten-steps-results-based-monitoring-evaluation-system-ten-steps-results-based-monitoring-evaluation-system-handbook-development-practitioners},
	abstract = {Technical / Tactical.  intro While the role of the state has changed and evolved during recent history, it is now readily apparent that good governance is key to achieving sustainable socioeconomic development. States are being challenged as never before by the demands of the global economy, new information and technology, and calls for greater participation and democracy. Governments and organizations all over the world are grappling with internal and external demands and pressures for improvements and reforms in public management. These demands come from a variety of sources including multilateral development institutions, donor governments, parliaments, the private sector, NGOs, citizens’ groups and civil society, the media, and so forth. Whether it is calls for greater accountability and transparency, enhanced effectiveness of development programs in exchange for foreign aid, or real results of political promises made, governments and organizations must be increasingly responsive to internal and external stakeholders to demonstrate tangible results. “The clamor for greater government effectiveness has reached crisis proportions in many developing countries where the state has failed to deliver even such fundamental public goods as property rights, roads, and basic health and education” (World Bank 1997, p. 2). In short, government performance has now become a global phenomenon. Results-based monitoring and evaluation (M\&E) is a powerful public management tool that can be used to help policymakers and decisionmakers track progress and demonstrate the impact of a given project, program, or policy. Results-based M\&E differs from traditional implementation-focused M\&E in that it moves beyond an emphasis on inputs and outputs to a greater focus on outcomes and impacts. etc},
	publisher = {The World Bank},
	author = {Kusek, J and Rist, R},
	year = {2004},
	keywords = {Grey Literature (websites)},
}
Downloads: 0