Atmospheric fungal nanoparticle bursts. Lawler, M., J., Draper, D., C., & Smith, J., N. Science Advances, 6(3):eaax9051, 1, 2020.
Atmospheric fungal nanoparticle bursts [link]Website  abstract   bibtex   
Aerosol nanoparticles play an important role in the climate system by affecting cloud formation and properties, as well as in human health because of their deep reach into lungs and the circulatory system. Determining nanoparticle sources and composition is a major challenge in assessing their impacts in these areas. The sudden appearance of large numbers of atmospheric nanoparticles is commonly attributed to secondary formation from gas-phase precursors, but in many cases, the evidence for this is equivocal. We report the detection of a mode of fungal fragments with a mobility diameter of roughly 30 nm released in episodic bursts in ambient air over an agricultural area in northern Oklahoma. These events reached concentrations orders of magnitude higher than other reports of biological particles and show similarities to unclarified events reported previously in the Amazon. These particles potentially represent a large source of both cloud-forming ice nuclei and respirable allergens in a variety of ecosystems.
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 title = {Atmospheric fungal nanoparticle bursts},
 type = {article},
 year = {2020},
 identifiers = {[object Object]},
 pages = {eaax9051},
 volume = {6},
 websites = {http://advances.sciencemag.org/content/6/3/eaax9051.abstract},
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 created = {2020-01-21T19:51:14.916Z},
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 abstract = {Aerosol nanoparticles play an important role in the climate system by affecting cloud formation and properties, as well as in human health because of their deep reach into lungs and the circulatory system. Determining nanoparticle sources and composition is a major challenge in assessing their impacts in these areas. The sudden appearance of large numbers of atmospheric nanoparticles is commonly attributed to secondary formation from gas-phase precursors, but in many cases, the evidence for this is equivocal. We report the detection of a mode of fungal fragments with a mobility diameter of roughly 30 nm released in episodic bursts in ambient air over an agricultural area in northern Oklahoma. These events reached concentrations orders of magnitude higher than other reports of biological particles and show similarities to unclarified events reported previously in the Amazon. These particles potentially represent a large source of both cloud-forming ice nuclei and respirable allergens in a variety of ecosystems.},
 bibtype = {article},
 author = {Lawler, Michael J. and Draper, Danielle C. and Smith, James N.},
 journal = {Science Advances},
 number = {3}
}

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