The History of Book Ciphers. Leighton, A. C. & Matyas, S. In Blakley, G. & Chaum, D., editors, Advances in Cryptology, volume 196, of Lecture Notes in Computer Science, pages 101--113. Springer Berlin / Heidelberg, 1985.
The History of Book Ciphers [link]Paper  abstract   bibtex   
You can do a lot with a book, besides read it! In fact, we know that by 1526 — some 70 years after Gutenberg printed his first Bible — at least one of out forebears, Jacobus Silvestri, was thinking of how a book might be used for cryptographic purposes. Silverstri wrote of a sort of code book, or dictionary, which he recommended as a means to encipher written communications. For Silvestri, we can trace the development of book ciphers over a period of at least 400 years.
@incollection{leighton_history_1985,
	series = {Lecture {Notes} in {Computer} {Science}},
	title = {The {History} of {Book} {Ciphers}},
	volume = {196},
	isbn = {978-3-540-15658-1},
	url = {http://www.springerlink.com.myaccess.library.utoronto.ca/content/uv6ttf6qadlfylr0/abstract/},
	abstract = {You can do a lot with a book, besides read it! In fact, we know that by 1526 — some 70 years after Gutenberg printed his first Bible — at least one of out forebears, Jacobus Silvestri, was thinking of how a book might be used for cryptographic purposes. Silverstri wrote of a sort of code book, or dictionary, which he recommended as a means to encipher written communications. For Silvestri, we can trace the development of book ciphers over a period of at least 400 years.},
	urldate = {2012-08-06TZ},
	booktitle = {Advances in {Cryptology}},
	publisher = {Springer Berlin / Heidelberg},
	author = {Leighton, Albert C. and Matyas, Stephen},
	editor = {Blakley, George and Chaum, David},
	year = {1985},
	keywords = {cryptography, cryptography -- medieval},
	pages = {101--113}
}
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