Vegetation patterns on a Southern Appalachian watershed after successive clearcuts. Leopold, D. J. Castanea, 1985.
Vegetation patterns on a Southern Appalachian watershed after successive clearcuts. [pdf]Paper  abstract   bibtex   
Watershed 13 at Coweeta Hydrologic Laboratory was clearcut in 1939-1940 and again in 1962. No timber was removed. Present vegetation composition (woody and herbaceous species), and tree species distributions are related to site characteristics. Liriodendron tulipifera had the highest basal area and Importance Value (IV) of all tree species; Quercus prinus had the highest density, Acer rubrum the highest frequency. Stand basal area 21 years after the second clearcut was over 80% of that before the first clearcut. Kalmia latifolia and Rhododendron maximum have responded vigorously to past clearcuts and the herbaceous layer is rich. Mesic species, especially Liriodendron tulipifera and Betula lenta have increased tremendously in importance since the inventory made in 1934 prior to either clearcut or the full effect of chestnut blight. These species now occupy more of the watershed and the watershed supports vegetation of a more mesic nature.
@article{leopold_vegetation_1985,
	title = {Vegetation patterns on a {Southern} {Appalachian} watershed after successive clearcuts.},
	volume = {50},
	url = {http://cwt33.ecology.uga.edu/publications/721.pdf},
	abstract = {Watershed 13 at Coweeta Hydrologic Laboratory was clearcut in 1939-1940 and again in 1962. No timber was removed. Present vegetation composition (woody and herbaceous species), and tree species distributions are related to site characteristics. Liriodendron tulipifera had the highest basal area and Importance Value (IV) of all tree species; Quercus prinus had the highest density, Acer rubrum the highest frequency. Stand basal area 21 years after the second clearcut was over 80\% of that before the first clearcut. Kalmia latifolia and Rhododendron maximum have responded vigorously to past clearcuts and the herbaceous layer is rich. Mesic species, especially Liriodendron tulipifera and Betula lenta have increased tremendously in importance since the inventory made in 1934 prior to either clearcut or the full effect of chestnut blight. These species now occupy more of the watershed and the watershed supports vegetation of a more mesic nature.},
	number = {3},
	journal = {Castanea},
	author = {Leopold, D. J.},
	year = {1985},
	keywords = {CWT}
}
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