William of Ockham, the Subalternate Sciences, and Aristotle's Theory of metabasis. Livesey, S. J. The British Journal for the History of Science, 18:127–146, 1985.
abstract   bibtex   
To be sure, the scientiae mediae played an enormous role in the new methods of the fourteenth century. But it is also true that the rules of subalternation and the attendant rules of what is and is not proper under Aristotle's prohibition of metabasiswere themselves undergoing a significant change in the fourteenth century. To see the extent of this shift, this paper will examine the works of William of Ockham and then briefly place this development in the context of Ockham's predecessors and successors.
@article{livesey_william_1985,
	title = {William of {Ockham}, the {Subalternate} {Sciences}, and {Aristotle}'s {Theory} of metabasis},
	volume = {18},
	shorttitle = {Ockham},
	abstract = {To be sure, the scientiae mediae played an enormous role in the new methods of the fourteenth century. But it is also true that the rules of subalternation and the attendant rules of what is and is not proper under Aristotle's prohibition of metabasiswere themselves undergoing a significant change in the fourteenth century. To see the extent of this shift, this paper will examine the works of William of Ockham and then briefly place this development in the context of Ockham's predecessors and successors.},
	journal = {The British Journal for the History of Science},
	author = {Livesey, Steven J.},
	year = {1985},
	keywords = {ARISTOTLE, MATHEMATICS, MATHEMATIZATION, METABASIS, OCKHAM, SCIENCE, SUBORDINATION},
	pages = {127--146}
}
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