Simulation of transcatheter aortic valve replacement in patient-specific aortic roots: effect of crimping and positioning on device performance. M., B.; R.P., G.; G., M.; M.J., S.; and D., B. In The 37th Annual International Conference of the Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society (EMBC’15), pages 282-285, Milan, Italy, August 25-29, 2015.
doi  abstract   bibtex   
Calcific aortic valve disease (CAVD) is a cardiovascular condition that causes the progressive narrowing of the aortic valve (AV) opening, due to the growth of bone-like deposits all over the aortic root (AR). Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR), a minimally invasive procedure, has recently become the only lifesaving solution for patients that cannot tolerate the standard surgical valve replacement. However, adverse effects, such as AR injury or paravalvular leakage (PVL), may occur as a consequence of a sub-optimal procedure, due to the presence of calcifications in situ. Additionally, the crimping required for delivering the valve via stenting may damage the valve. The aim of the present study is to comparatively assess the crimping mechanics of the commercialized Edwards SAPIEN valve and an alternative polymeric valve (Polynova, Inc) and to evaluate the effect of different TAVR deployment positions using patient-specific numerical models. The optimal deployment location for achieving better patient outcomes was calculated and based on the interactions between the TAVR stent and the native AR. Results demonstrated that the Polynova valve withstands the crimping process better than the SAPIEN valve. Furthermore, deployment simulations showed the role that calcifications deposits may play in the TAVR sub-optimal valve anchoring to the AV wall, leading to the presence of gaps that result in PVL.
@InProceedings{M7,
  cpaper				   = {1},
  Title                    = {{Simulation of transcatheter aortic valve replacement in patient-specific aortic roots: effect of crimping and positioning on device performance}},
  Author                   = {Bianchi M. and Ghosh R.P. and Marom G. and Slepian M.J. and Bluestein D.},
  
  Booktitle				   = {The 37th Annual International Conference of the Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society (EMBC’15)},
  address 				   = {Milan, Italy}, 
  month					   = {August 25-29}, 
  Year                     = {2015},

  ISBN				       = {978-1-4244-9270-1}, 
  Pages                    = {282-285},
  doi					   = {10.1109/EMBC.2015.7318355},

  pdf_Link 				   = {https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/spa/jzgrrlqcl3z3xev/testing/public/papers/EMBC2015.pdf},
  Abstract				   = {Calcific aortic valve disease (CAVD) is a cardiovascular condition that causes the progressive narrowing of the aortic valve (AV) opening, due to the growth of bone-like deposits all over the aortic root (AR). Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR), a minimally invasive procedure, has recently become the only lifesaving solution for patients that cannot tolerate the standard surgical valve replacement. However, adverse effects, such as AR injury or paravalvular leakage (PVL), may occur as a consequence of a sub-optimal procedure, due to the presence of calcifications in situ. Additionally, the crimping required for delivering the valve via stenting may damage the valve. The aim of the present study is to comparatively assess the crimping mechanics of the commercialized Edwards SAPIEN valve and an alternative polymeric valve (Polynova, Inc) and to evaluate the effect of different TAVR deployment positions using patient-specific numerical models. The optimal deployment location for achieving better patient outcomes was calculated and based on the interactions between the TAVR stent and the native AR. Results demonstrated that the Polynova valve withstands the crimping process better than the SAPIEN valve. Furthermore, deployment simulations showed the role that calcifications deposits may play in the TAVR sub-optimal valve anchoring to the AV wall, leading to the presence of gaps that result in PVL.},
  cited_by 		           = {3},
  gscholar_Link 		   = {2906712611055543070}
}
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