The Structural Origins of Wood Cell Wall Toughness. Maaß, M.; Saleh, S.; Militz, H.; and Volkert, C. A. Advanced Materials, 32(16):1907693, 2020. _eprint: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/pdf/10.1002/adma.201907693
The Structural Origins of Wood Cell Wall Toughness [link]Paper  doi  abstract   bibtex   3 downloads  
The remarkable mechanical stability of wood is primarily attributed to the hierarchical fibrous arrangement of the polymeric components. While the mechanisms by which fibrous cell structure and cellulose microfibril arrangements lend stiffness and strength to wood have been intensively studied, the structural origins of the relatively high splitting fracture toughness remain unclear. This study relates cellulose microfibril arrangements to splitting fracture toughness in pine wood cell walls using in situ electron microscopy and reveals a previously unknown toughening mechanism: the specific arrangement of cellulose microfibrils in the cell wall deflects cracks from the S2 layer to the S1/S2 interface, and, once there, causes the crack to be repetitively arrested and shunted along the interface in a zig-zag path. It is suggested that this natural adaptation of wood to achieve tough interfaces and then deflect and trap cracks at them can be generalized to provide design guidelines to improve toughness of high-performance and renewable engineering materials.
@article{maas_structural_2020,
	title = {The {Structural} {Origins} of {Wood} {Cell} {Wall} {Toughness}},
	volume = {32},
	copyright = {© 2020 The Authors. Published by WILEY‐VCH Verlag GmbH \& Co. KGaA, Weinheim},
	issn = {1521-4095},
	url = {https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1002/adma.201907693},
	doi = {10.1002/adma.201907693},
	abstract = {The remarkable mechanical stability of wood is primarily attributed to the hierarchical fibrous arrangement of the polymeric components. While the mechanisms by which fibrous cell structure and cellulose microfibril arrangements lend stiffness and strength to wood have been intensively studied, the structural origins of the relatively high splitting fracture toughness remain unclear. This study relates cellulose microfibril arrangements to splitting fracture toughness in pine wood cell walls using in situ electron microscopy and reveals a previously unknown toughening mechanism: the specific arrangement of cellulose microfibrils in the cell wall deflects cracks from the S2 layer to the S1/S2 interface, and, once there, causes the crack to be repetitively arrested and shunted along the interface in a zig-zag path. It is suggested that this natural adaptation of wood to achieve tough interfaces and then deflect and trap cracks at them can be generalized to provide design guidelines to improve toughness of high-performance and renewable engineering materials.},
	language = {en},
	number = {16},
	urldate = {2020-08-27},
	journal = {Advanced Materials},
	author = {Maaß, Mona-Christin and Saleh, Salimeh and Militz, Holger and Volkert, Cynthia A.},
	year = {2020},
	note = {\_eprint: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/pdf/10.1002/adma.201907693},
	keywords = {wood, fracture, microfibril angle, wood cell wall toughness},
	pages = {1907693},
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}
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