Intergroup emotions theory. Mackie, D. M., Maitner, A. T., & Smith, E. R. In Handbook of prejudice, stereotyping, and discrimination, 2nd ed., pages 149–174. Psychology Press, New York, NY, US, 2016.
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In this chapter we first describe the basic tenets of intergroup emotions theory (IET), focusing on the social categorization and identification processes that we believe make emotion an intergroup phenomenon, the similarities and differences between individual and intergroup emotion, and the consequences of intergroup emotion for intergroup behavior. We then describe some of the empirical evidence relevant to IET that has accumulated from our own and others' research programs in recent years. IET has been developed and extended several times, in particular to emphasize the multiple roles of identification, the functionally adaptive role of emotion in regulating intergroup reactions and interactions, the predictable variability in intergroup relations over time and context, including positive as well as negative relations, and the applicability of the theory across cultures and types of groups. As our thinking about intergroup emotion has evolved, new lines of theoretical and empirical refinement and extension have suggested themselves, and we next describe and review some of the programs of research currently under development. Finally, we note what we believe to be the distinctive features of the IET approach for the understanding of intergroup behavior, in the hope that this will also encourage others to extend the theory in new directions. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved)
@incollection{mackie_intergroup_2016,
	address = {New York,  NY,  US},
	title = {Intergroup emotions theory.},
	isbn = {978-1-84872-668-0 (Hardcover); 978-1-84872-669-7 (Paperback); 978-0-203-36199-3 (Digital (undefined format))},
	abstract = {In this chapter we first describe the basic tenets of intergroup emotions theory (IET), focusing on the social categorization and identification processes that we believe make emotion an intergroup phenomenon, the similarities and differences between individual and intergroup emotion, and the consequences of intergroup emotion for intergroup behavior. We then describe some of the empirical evidence relevant to IET that has accumulated from our own and others' research programs in recent years. IET has been developed and extended several times, in particular to emphasize the multiple roles of identification, the functionally adaptive role of emotion in regulating intergroup reactions and interactions, the predictable variability in intergroup relations over time and context, including positive as well as negative relations, and the applicability of the theory across cultures and types of groups. As our thinking about intergroup emotion has evolved, new lines of theoretical and empirical refinement and extension have suggested themselves, and we next describe and review some of the programs of research currently under development. Finally, we note what we believe to be the distinctive features of the IET approach for the understanding of intergroup behavior, in the hope that this will also encourage others to extend the theory in new directions. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved)},
	booktitle = {Handbook of prejudice, stereotyping, and discrimination, 2nd ed.},
	publisher = {Psychology Press},
	author = {Mackie, Diane M. and Maitner, Angela T. and Smith, Eliot R.},
	year = {2016},
	keywords = {*Emotions, *Intergroup Dynamics, *Theories, Experimentation, Roles, Social Identity, Social Structure},
	pages = {149--174},
}
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