The effect of mercury on baseline corticosterone in a breeding songbird. Maddux, S., L.; Cristol, D., A.; Varian-Ramos, C., W.; and Bradley, E., L. Bulletin of Environmental Contamination and Toxicology, 94(2):135-139, 2015.
abstract   bibtex   
Although songbirds accumulate mercury at rates equivalent to better-studied aquatic avian species, effects of mercury bioaccumulation in songbirds remain understudied. Little is known about the effects of mercury on endocrine physiology, but recent evidence indicates that mercury may disrupt the function of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. Both field-based correlational studies and a recent dosing experiment suggest that mercury exposure alters levels of the primary avian stress hormone, CORT. We sampled zebra finches that had been dosed with 0, 0.5, or 1.0 ppm dietary methylmercury for baseline CORT twice; once during pairing and once after successfully fledging young. Circulating levels of CORT were not significantly affected by mercury exposure. However, our findings indicate potentially important differences in CORT responses between the sexes when exposed to environmentally relevant doses of mercury across the nesting cycle.
@article{
 title = {The effect of mercury on baseline corticosterone in a breeding songbird},
 type = {article},
 year = {2015},
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 keywords = {Corticosterone,Endocrine disruption,Mercury,Stress,Zebra finch},
 pages = {135-139},
 volume = {94},
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 abstract = {Although songbirds accumulate mercury at rates equivalent to better-studied aquatic avian species, effects of mercury bioaccumulation in songbirds remain understudied. Little is known about the effects of mercury on endocrine physiology, but recent evidence indicates that mercury may disrupt the function of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. Both field-based correlational studies and a recent dosing experiment suggest that mercury exposure alters levels of the primary avian stress hormone, CORT. We sampled zebra finches that had been dosed with 0, 0.5, or 1.0 ppm dietary methylmercury for baseline CORT twice; once during pairing and once after successfully fledging young. Circulating levels of CORT were not significantly affected by mercury exposure. However, our findings indicate potentially important differences in CORT responses between the sexes when exposed to environmentally relevant doses of mercury across the nesting cycle.},
 bibtype = {article},
 author = {Maddux, Sarah L. and Cristol, Daniel A. and Varian-Ramos, Claire W. and Bradley, Eric L.},
 journal = {Bulletin of Environmental Contamination and Toxicology},
 number = {2}
}
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