Micromotors with asymmetric shape that efficiently convert light into work by thermocapillary effects. Maggi, C.; Saglimbeni, F.; Dipalo, M.; De Angelis, F.; and Di Leonardo, R. Nature Communications, Nature Publishing Group, 2015. cited By 109
Micromotors with asymmetric shape that efficiently convert light into work by thermocapillary effects [link]Paper  doi  abstract   bibtex   
The direct conversion of light into work allows the driving of micron-sized motors in a contactless, controllable and continuous way. Light-to-work conversion can involve either direct transfer of optical momentum or indirect opto-thermal effects. Both strategies have been implemented using different coupling mechanisms. However, the resulting efficiencies are always very low, and high power densities, generally obtained by focused laser beams, are required. Here we show that microfabricated gears, sitting on a liquid-air interface, can efficiently convert absorbed light into rotational motion through a thermocapillary effect. We demonstrate rotation rates up to 300r.p.m. under wide-field illumination with incoherent light. Our analysis shows that thermocapillary propulsion is one of the strongest mechanisms for light actuation at the micron- and nanoscale.
@ARTICLE{Maggi2015,
author={Maggi, C. and Saglimbeni, F. and Dipalo, M. and De Angelis, F. and Di Leonardo, R.},
title={Micromotors with asymmetric shape that efficiently convert light into work by thermocapillary effects},
journal={Nature Communications},
year={2015},
volume={6},
doi={10.1038/ncomms8855},
art_number={7855},
note={cited By 109},
url={https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-84938223652&doi=10.1038%2fncomms8855&partnerID=40&md5=5841978bad543b209e948125050ec095},
abstract={The direct conversion of light into work allows the driving of micron-sized motors in a contactless, controllable and continuous way. Light-to-work conversion can involve either direct transfer of optical momentum or indirect opto-thermal effects. Both strategies have been implemented using different coupling mechanisms. However, the resulting efficiencies are always very low, and high power densities, generally obtained by focused laser beams, are required. Here we show that microfabricated gears, sitting on a liquid-air interface, can efficiently convert absorbed light into rotational motion through a thermocapillary effect. We demonstrate rotation rates up to 300r.p.m. under wide-field illumination with incoherent light. Our analysis shows that thermocapillary propulsion is one of the strongest mechanisms for light actuation at the micron- and nanoscale.},
publisher={Nature Publishing Group},
issn={20411723},
document_type={Article},
source={Scopus},
}
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