Acute neurology during the COVID-19 pandemic: Supporting the front line. Majersik, J. J. and Reddy, V. K. Neurology, April, 2020.
Acute neurology during the COVID-19 pandemic: Supporting the front line [link]Paper  doi  abstract   bibtex   
Neurologists are affected by the COVID-19 pandemic in several key ways, including: a reduced ability to admit and accept in transfer critically ill neurologic patients due to census overflow; personal risk of exposure to COVID-19; and potentially redeployment of the acute neurologist workforce towards general medicine to assist our colleagues managing the surge of medical patients. As providers of inpatient and emergency-based acute neurologic care, we have been attempting to locally prepare for and manage the COVID-19 pandemic by focusing on 3 key areas: creating an integrated preparation plan that supports hospital measures; building an optimized, flexible, and redundant workforce; and maintaining a high level of neurologic care in our hospital and across our region despite limited transfer capabilities during the pandemic. This final concern is of key relevance in our region where our tertiary hospital supports numerous smaller community hospitals, typically by providing an open door to patient transfers. These hospitals are often in rural or frontier regions and are also affected by COVID-19, so not only are beginning to experience their own bed and clinician shortages, 1 but are understandably nervous about what the pandemic means for the availability of traditional support systems for other non-COVID-related diseases.
@article{majersik_acute_2020,
	title = {Acute neurology during the {COVID}-19 pandemic: {Supporting} the front line},
	issn = {0028-3878, 1526-632X},
	shorttitle = {Acute neurology during the {COVID}-19 pandemic},
	url = {http://www.neurology.org/lookup/doi/10.1212/WNL.0000000000009564},
	doi = {10.1212/WNL.0000000000009564},
	abstract = {Neurologists are affected by the COVID-19 pandemic in several key ways, including: a reduced ability to admit and accept in transfer critically ill neurologic patients due to census overflow; personal risk of exposure to COVID-19; and potentially redeployment of the acute neurologist workforce towards general medicine to assist our colleagues managing the surge of medical patients. As providers of inpatient and emergency-based acute neurologic care, we have been attempting to locally prepare for and manage the COVID-19 pandemic by focusing on 3 key areas: creating an integrated preparation plan that supports hospital measures; building an optimized, flexible, and redundant workforce; and maintaining a high level of neurologic care in our hospital and across our region despite limited transfer capabilities during the pandemic. This final concern is of key relevance in our region where our tertiary hospital supports numerous smaller community hospitals, typically by providing an open door to patient transfers. These hospitals are often in rural or frontier regions and are also affected by COVID-19, so not only are beginning to experience their own bed and clinician shortages,
              1
              but are understandably nervous about what the pandemic means for the availability of traditional support systems for other non-COVID-related diseases.},
	language = {en},
	urldate = {2020-04-20},
	journal = {Neurology},
	author = {Majersik, Jennifer J. and Reddy, Vivek K.},
	month = apr,
	year = {2020},
	keywords = {Covid19},
	pages = {10.1212/WNL.0000000000009564}
}
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