Toxicity, bioaccumulation and biotransformation of glucose-capped silver nanoparticles in green microalgae chlorella vulgaris. Mariano, S.; Panzarini, E.; Inverno, M.; Voulvoulis, N.; and Dini, L. Nanomaterials, 10(7):1-15, MDPI AG, 2020. cited By 1
Toxicity, bioaccumulation and biotransformation of glucose-capped silver nanoparticles in green microalgae chlorella vulgaris [link]Paper  doi  abstract   bibtex   
Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) are one of the most widely used nanomaterials in consumer products. When discharged into the aquatic environment AgNPs can cause toxicity to aquatic biota, through mechanisms that are still under debate, thus rendering the nanoparticles (NPs) effects evaluation a necessary step. Different aquatic organism models, i.e., microalgae, mussels, Daphnia magna, sea urchins and Danio rerio, etc. have been largely exploited for NPs toxicity assessment. On the other hand, alternative biological microorganisms abundantly present in nature, i.e., microalgae, are nowadays exploited as a potential sink for removal of toxic substances from the environment. Indeed, the green microalgae Chlorella vulgaris is one of the most used microorganisms for waste treatment. With the aim to verify the possible involvement of C. vulgaris not only as a model microorganism of NPs toxicity but also for the protection toward NPs pollution, we used these microalgae to measure the AgNPs biotoxicity and bioaccumulation. In particular, to exclude any toxicity derived by Ag+ ions release, green chemistry-synthesised and glucose-coated AgNPs (AgNPs-G) were used. C. vulgaris actively internalised AgNPs-G whose amount increases in a timeand dose-dependent manner. The internalised NPs, found inside large vacuoles, were not released back into the medium, even after 1 week, and did not undergo biotransformation since AgNPs-G maintained their crystalline nature. Biotoxicity of AgNPs-G causes an exposure time and AgNPs-G dose-dependent growth reduction and a decrease in chlorophyll-a amount. These results confirm C. vulgaris as a bioaccumulating microalgae for possible use in environmental protection. © 2020 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland.
@ARTICLE{Mariano20201,
author={Mariano, S. and Panzarini, E. and Inverno, M.D. and Voulvoulis, N. and Dini, L.},
title={Toxicity, bioaccumulation and biotransformation of glucose-capped silver nanoparticles in green microalgae chlorella vulgaris},
journal={Nanomaterials},
year={2020},
volume={10},
number={7},
pages={1-15},
doi={10.3390/nano10071377},
art_number={1377},
note={cited By 1},
url={https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-85088048359&doi=10.3390%2fnano10071377&partnerID=40&md5=7b58270adf865caaf45723fc8f0e7d58},
abstract={Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) are one of the most widely used nanomaterials in consumer products. When discharged into the aquatic environment AgNPs can cause toxicity to aquatic biota, through mechanisms that are still under debate, thus rendering the nanoparticles (NPs) effects evaluation a necessary step. Different aquatic organism models, i.e., microalgae, mussels, Daphnia magna, sea urchins and Danio rerio, etc. have been largely exploited for NPs toxicity assessment. On the other hand, alternative biological microorganisms abundantly present in nature, i.e., microalgae, are nowadays exploited as a potential sink for removal of toxic substances from the environment. Indeed, the green microalgae Chlorella vulgaris is one of the most used microorganisms for waste treatment. With the aim to verify the possible involvement of C. vulgaris not only as a model microorganism of NPs toxicity but also for the protection toward NPs pollution, we used these microalgae to measure the AgNPs biotoxicity and bioaccumulation. In particular, to exclude any toxicity derived by Ag+ ions release, green chemistry-synthesised and glucose-coated AgNPs (AgNPs-G) were used. C. vulgaris actively internalised AgNPs-G whose amount increases in a timeand dose-dependent manner. The internalised NPs, found inside large vacuoles, were not released back into the medium, even after 1 week, and did not undergo biotransformation since AgNPs-G maintained their crystalline nature. Biotoxicity of AgNPs-G causes an exposure time and AgNPs-G dose-dependent growth reduction and a decrease in chlorophyll-a amount. These results confirm C. vulgaris as a bioaccumulating microalgae for possible use in environmental protection. © 2020 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland.},
publisher={MDPI AG},
issn={20794991},
document_type={Article},
source={Scopus},
}
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