Governance in the Age of Digital Media and Branding. Marland, A., Lewis, J. P., & Flanagan, T. Governance, March, 2016.
Governance in the Age of Digital Media and Branding [link]Paper  doi  abstract   bibtex   
The politicization of government communications requires intense control. Centralization of government power accompanies advances in information and communications technology, as political elites use branding strategy in an attempt to impose discipline on their messengers and on media coverage. The strategic appeal of public sector branding is that it replaces conflicting messages with penetrating message reinforcement. Among the notable features are central control, a marketing ethos, a master brand, communications cohesiveness, and message simplicity. Together these features work to conflate the party government and the public service, which perpetuates trends of centralization. Using Canada's Conservative government (2006–2015) as a case study, public sector branding explains the hyper control over government communications and demonstrates why these developments can be expected to last, regardless of which party or leader is in control.
@article{marland_governance_2016,
	title = {Governance in the {Age} of {Digital} {Media} and {Branding}},
	copyright = {© 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc},
	issn = {1468-0491},
	url = {http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/gove.12194/abstract},
	doi = {10.1111/gove.12194},
	abstract = {The politicization of government communications requires intense control. Centralization of government power accompanies advances in information and communications technology, as political elites use branding strategy in an attempt to impose discipline on their messengers and on media coverage. The strategic appeal of public sector branding is that it replaces conflicting messages with penetrating message reinforcement. Among the notable features are central control, a marketing ethos, a master brand, communications cohesiveness, and message simplicity. Together these features work to conflate the party government and the public service, which perpetuates trends of centralization. Using Canada's Conservative government (2006–2015) as a case study, public sector branding explains the hyper control over government communications and demonstrates why these developments can be expected to last, regardless of which party or leader is in control.},
	language = {en},
	urldate = {2016-03-23},
	journal = {Governance},
	author = {Marland, Alex and Lewis, J. P. and Flanagan, Tom},
	month = mar,
	year = {2016},
	pages = {n/a--n/a},
	file = {Marland_et_al-2016-Governance.pdf:files/54240/Marland_et_al-2016-Governance.pdf:application/pdf;Snapshot:files/54241/abstract.html:text/html}
}
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