What Are the Novels of the Anthropocene? American Fiction in Geological Time. Marshall, K. American Literary History, 27(3):523–538, 2015. 00002
What Are the Novels of the Anthropocene? American Fiction in Geological Time [link]Paper  abstract   bibtex   
At this point in the twenty-first century, it has become difficult to take up the topic of temporality in contemporary fiction without reference to the geological concept of the Anthropocene. This term, used reflexively to name our present geological epoch as one of our own making, is infiltrating the self-periodizing gestures of both novels and their critical apparatus in ways that are, like the epoch's traces themselves, becoming more visible. What's captured by the concept is now well-known: for humanists, by way of Dipesh Chakrabarty's argument in “The Climate of History,” that in the Anthropocene human history and geological history have become one; for social theorists, by way of Bruno Latour's claim that the Anthropocene is the most important concept since modernity; and of course, for geologists, by way of the still-active debates among stratigraphers over the naming of our present geological epoch.1 The Anthropocene, more simply, is a way of marking time, or suggesting that there is a form of temporality that can be understood as a mediation of the surface of the globe by the human species.
@article{marshall_what_2015,
	title = {What {Are} the {Novels} of the {Anthropocene}? {American} {Fiction} in {Geological} {Time}},
	volume = {27},
	shorttitle = {What {Are} the {Novels} of the {Anthropocene}?},
	url = {http://alh.oxfordjournals.org/content/27/3/523.short},
	abstract = {At this point in the twenty-first century, it has become difficult to take up the topic of temporality in contemporary fiction without reference to the geological concept of the Anthropocene. This term, used reflexively to name our present geological epoch as one of our own making, is infiltrating the self-periodizing gestures of both novels and their critical apparatus in ways that are, like the epoch's traces themselves, becoming more visible. What's captured by the concept is now well-known: for humanists, by way of Dipesh Chakrabarty's argument in “The Climate of History,” that in the Anthropocene human history and geological history have become one; for social theorists, by way of Bruno Latour's claim that the Anthropocene is the most important concept since modernity; and of course, for geologists, by way of the still-active debates among stratigraphers over the naming of our present geological epoch.1 The Anthropocene, more simply, is a way of marking time, or suggesting that there is a form of temporality that can be understood as a mediation of the surface of the globe by the human species.},
	number = {3},
	urldate = {2016-12-06},
	journal = {American Literary History},
	author = {Marshall, Kate},
	year = {2015},
	note = {00002},
	keywords = {anthropocene, collapse, sociology, storytelling},
	pages = {523--538},
	file = {Marshall - 2015 - What Are the Novels of the Anthropocene American .pdf:C\:\\Users\\rsrs\\Documents\\Zotero Database\\storage\\PHZRP3FS\\Marshall - 2015 - What Are the Novels of the Anthropocene American .pdf:application/pdf}
}
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