Osteoarthritis. Martel-Pelletier, J., Barr, A. J., Cicuttini, F. M., Conaghan, P. G., Cooper, C., Goldring, M. B., Goldring, S. R., Jones, G., Teichtahl, A. J., & Pelletier, J. Nature Reviews Disease Primers, 2:16072, October, 2016.
Osteoarthritis [link]Paper  doi  abstract   bibtex   
Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common joint disorder, is associated with an increasing socioeconomic impact owing to the ageing population and mainly affects the diarthrodial joints. Primary OA results from a combination of risk factors, with increasing age and obesity being the most prominent. The concept of the pathophysiology is still evolving, from being viewed as cartilage-limited to a multifactorial disease that affects the whole joint. An intricate relationship between local and systemic factors modulates its clinical and structural presentations, leading to a common final pathway of joint destruction. Pharmacological treatments are mostly related to relief of symptoms and there is no disease-modifying OA drug (that is, treatment that will reduce symptoms in addition to slowing or stopping the disease progression) yet approved by the regulatory agencies. Identifying phenotypes of patients will enable the detection of the disease in its early stages as well as distinguish individuals who are at higher risk of progression, which in turn could be used to guide clinical decision making and allow more effective and specific therapeutic interventions to be designed. This Primer is an update on the progress made in the field of OA epidemiology, quality of life, pathophysiological mechanisms, diagnosis, screening, prevention and disease management.
@article{martel-pelletier_osteoarthritis_2016,
	title = {Osteoarthritis},
	volume = {2},
	copyright = {2016 Nature Publishing Group},
	issn = {2056-676X},
	url = {https://www.nature.com/articles/nrdp201672},
	doi = {10.1038/nrdp.2016.72},
	abstract = {Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common joint disorder, is associated with an increasing socioeconomic impact owing to the ageing population and mainly affects the diarthrodial joints. Primary OA results from a combination of risk factors, with increasing age and obesity being the most prominent. The concept of the pathophysiology is still evolving, from being viewed as cartilage-limited to a multifactorial disease that affects the whole joint. An intricate relationship between local and systemic factors modulates its clinical and structural presentations, leading to a common final pathway of joint destruction. Pharmacological treatments are mostly related to relief of symptoms and there is no disease-modifying OA drug (that is, treatment that will reduce symptoms in addition to slowing or stopping the disease progression) yet approved by the regulatory agencies. Identifying phenotypes of patients will enable the detection of the disease in its early stages as well as distinguish individuals who are at higher risk of progression, which in turn could be used to guide clinical decision making and allow more effective and specific therapeutic interventions to be designed. This Primer is an update on the progress made in the field of OA epidemiology, quality of life, pathophysiological mechanisms, diagnosis, screening, prevention and disease management.},
	language = {en},
	urldate = {2019-01-04},
	journal = {Nature Reviews Disease Primers},
	author = {Martel-Pelletier, Johanne and Barr, Andrew J. and Cicuttini, Flavia M. and Conaghan, Philip G. and Cooper, Cyrus and Goldring, Mary B. and Goldring, Steven R. and Jones, Graeme and Teichtahl, Andrew J. and Pelletier, Jean-Pierre},
	month = oct,
	year = {2016},
	pages = {16072}
}
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