Applying Learning Analytics to Investigate Timed Release in Online Learning. Martin, F., Whitmer, J., C., & Whitmer JohnWhitmer, J., C. Tech Know Learn, 21:59-74, 2016.
Applying Learning Analytics to Investigate Timed Release in Online Learning [pdf]Paper  abstract   bibtex   
Adaptive learning gives learners control of context, pace, and scope of their learning experience. This strategy can be implemented in online learning by using the ''Adaptive Release'' feature in learning management systems. The purpose of this study was to use learning analytics research methods to explore the extent to which the adaptive release feature affected student behavior in the online environment and course performance. Existing data from two sections of an online pre-service teacher education courses from a Southeastern university were analyzed for this study. Both courses were taught by the same instructor in a 15 weeks time period. One section was designed with the adaptive release feature for content release and the other did not have the adaptive release feature. All other elements of the course were the same. Data from five interaction measures was analyzed (logins, total time spent, average time per session, content modules accessed, time between module open and access) to explore the effect of the adaptive release feature. The findings indicated that there was a significant difference between the use of adaptive release and average login session. Considered as the average time of module access across the entire course, adaptive release did not systematically change when students accessed course materials. The findings also indicated significant differences between the experimental and control courses, especially for the first course module. This study has implications for instructors and instructional designers who design blended and online courses.
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 abstract = {Adaptive learning gives learners control of context, pace, and scope of their learning experience. This strategy can be implemented in online learning by using the ''Adaptive Release'' feature in learning management systems. The purpose of this study was to use learning analytics research methods to explore the extent to which the adaptive release feature affected student behavior in the online environment and course performance. Existing data from two sections of an online pre-service teacher education courses from a Southeastern university were analyzed for this study. Both courses were taught by the same instructor in a 15 weeks time period. One section was designed with the adaptive release feature for content release and the other did not have the adaptive release feature. All other elements of the course were the same. Data from five interaction measures was analyzed (logins, total time spent, average time per session, content modules accessed, time between module open and access) to explore the effect of the adaptive release feature. The findings indicated that there was a significant difference between the use of adaptive release and average login session. Considered as the average time of module access across the entire course, adaptive release did not systematically change when students accessed course materials. The findings also indicated significant differences between the experimental and control courses, especially for the first course module. This study has implications for instructors and instructional designers who design blended and online courses.},
 bibtype = {article},
 author = {Martin, Florence and Whitmer, John C and Whitmer JohnWhitmer, John C},
 journal = {Tech Know Learn}
}
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