Social support and gender differences in coping with depression among emerging adults: a mixed-methods study. Martínez-Hernáez, A., Carceller-Maicas, N., DiGiacomo, S. M, & Ariste, S. Child and adolescent psychiatry and mental health, 10:2, 2016.
Social support and gender differences in coping with depression among emerging adults: a mixed-methods study [link]Paper  doi  abstract   bibtex   
BACKGROUND: Depression affects a considerable proportion (12-25 %) of adolescents and so-called emerging adults (ages of 18 and 25). The aims of this study were to explore the relationship between perceived social support and depression in a sample of emerging adults, and subsequently to identify the type of social support young people consider most helpful in dealing with this type of emotional distress. METHODS: A sample of 105 young persons (17-21 years of age) was selected from a previous longitudinal study to create three groups of participants: subjects with a previous diagnosis of depression; subjects with self-perceived but undiagnosed distress compatible with depression; and a group of controls. Qualitative and validated instruments for measuring depressive symptoms (the BDI-II, Beck depression inventory) and social support (the Mannheim interview on social support) were administered. RESULTS: Loss of friendships over time and dissatisfaction with social and psychological support are variables associated with depression in emerging adulthood. Qualitative analysis revealed gender differences both in strategies for managing distress, and in how social support was understood to mitigate depressive symptoms. Male study participants prioritized support that helped them achieve self-control as a first step toward awareness of their emotional distress, while female study participants prioritized support that helped them achieve awareness of the problem as a first step toward self-control. CONCLUSIONS: Treatment for emerging adults with depression should take into account not only the impact of social support, but also gender differences in what they consider to be the most appropriate form of social support for dealing with emotional distress.
@article{martinez-hernaez_social_2016,
	title = {Social support and gender differences in coping with depression among emerging adults: a mixed-methods study},
	volume = {10},
	issn = {1753-2000},
	url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13034-015-0088-x},
	doi = {10.1186/s13034-015-0088-x},
	abstract = {BACKGROUND: Depression affects a considerable proportion (12-25 \%) of adolescents and so-called emerging adults (ages of 18 and 25). The aims of this study were to explore the relationship between perceived social support and depression in a sample of emerging adults, and subsequently to identify the type of social support young people consider most helpful in dealing with this type of emotional distress. METHODS: A sample of 105 young persons (17-21 years of age) was selected from a previous longitudinal study to create three groups of participants: subjects with a previous diagnosis of depression; subjects with self-perceived but undiagnosed distress compatible with depression; and a group of controls. Qualitative and validated instruments for measuring depressive symptoms (the BDI-II, Beck depression inventory) and social support (the Mannheim interview on social support) were administered. RESULTS: Loss of friendships over time and dissatisfaction with social and psychological support are variables associated with depression in emerging adulthood. Qualitative analysis revealed gender differences both in strategies for managing distress, and in how social support was understood to mitigate depressive symptoms. Male study participants prioritized support that helped them achieve self-control as a first step toward awareness of their emotional distress, while female study participants prioritized support that helped them achieve awareness of the problem as a first step toward self-control. CONCLUSIONS: Treatment for emerging adults with depression should take into account not only the impact of social support, but also gender differences in what they consider to be the most appropriate form of social support for dealing with emotional distress.},
	language = {en},
	journal = {Child and adolescent psychiatry and mental health},
	author = {Martínez-Hernáez, Angel and Carceller-Maicas, Natàlia and DiGiacomo, Susan M and Ariste, Santiago},
	year = {2016},
	pmid = {26744601},
	keywords = {Emerging adulthood, Emotional distress, Important, Mixed-methods study, Social support, depression},
	pages = {2}
}
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