Vegetation change and conservation status of Coastal Upland Swamps. Mason, T. J. & Keith, D. A. Ecological Management & Restoration, 17(3):254–256, September, 2016.
Vegetation change and conservation status of Coastal Upland Swamps [link]Paper  doi  abstract   bibtex   
Coastal Upland Swamp communities are characterized by high biodiversity and provide habitat for a range of threatened flora and fauna. In this research project, we are monitoring swamp vegetation dynamics over decadal timescales and relating observed changes to environmental factors. We have also modelled potential effects of climate change on swamp distributions. We found that swamp communities are spatially dynamic, both internally and in relation to the woodland matrix. Transitions between communities depended on initial states. In addition, these water-dependent communities appeared highly sensitive to projected climate change and their Endangered' status makes their active management a high priority. Improved understanding of dynamics at the community and landscape scale facilitates horizon scanning and improves our capacity to plan effective management interventions now and under future management and climate change scenarios.
@article{mason_vegetation_2016,
	title = {Vegetation change and conservation status of {Coastal} {Upland} {Swamps}},
	volume = {17},
	issn = {1442-7001},
	shorttitle = {Vegetation change and conservation status of {Coastal} {Upland} {Swamps}},
	url = {://WOS:000385436000013},
	doi = {10.1111/emr.12220},
	abstract = {Coastal Upland Swamp communities are characterized by high biodiversity and provide habitat for a range of threatened flora and fauna. In this research project, we are monitoring swamp vegetation dynamics over decadal timescales and relating observed changes to environmental factors. We have also modelled potential effects of climate change on swamp distributions. We found that swamp communities are spatially dynamic, both internally and in relation to the woodland matrix. Transitions between communities depended on initial states. In addition, these water-dependent communities appeared highly sensitive to projected climate change and their Endangered' status makes their active management a high priority. Improved understanding of dynamics at the community and landscape scale facilitates horizon scanning and improves our capacity to plan effective management interventions now and under future management and climate change scenarios.},
	number = {3},
	journal = {Ecological Management \& Restoration},
	author = {Mason, Tanya J. and Keith, David A.},
	month = sep,
	year = {2016},
	pages = {254--256}
}
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