Evaluating the predictive skills of ocean circulation models in tracking the drift of a human body: A case study. Mateus, M.; Pinto, L.; and Chambel-Leitaõ, P. Australian Journal of Forensic Sciences, 2015.
Evaluating the predictive skills of ocean circulation models in tracking the drift of a human body: A case study [pdf]Paper  abstract   bibtex   
Ocean circulation models are frequently used in maritime Search and Rescue operations due to their skill in simulating the effects of local currents on the transport of people or objects. They are also occasionally used in forensic contexts. Frequently, positively or neutrally buoyant passive particles are used in these simulations, as a proxy for the ‘objects’ in the study. In this paper, the adequacy of passive particle model simulations is tested in an attempt to reproduce the drift of a real case situation. The case study consists of a drowning accident in which the drift was ~2 km for a post-mortem submersion interval (PMSI) of 8.6 days. The simula- tion results highlighted the limitation of the methodology to predict the correct drift. However, we discuss the shortcomings of the modelling approach, and suggest ways to improve the skill of such numerical tools in predicting body drift after drowning accidents.
@article{
 title = {Evaluating the predictive skills of ocean circulation models in tracking the drift of a human body: A case study},
 type = {article},
 year = {2015},
 identifiers = {[object Object]},
 keywords = {Computer simulations,accumulated degree days,body drift,drowning,forensic oceanography,post-mortem submersion interval},
 id = {d8a66449-977e-36aa-9551-3ada51e0810a},
 created = {2018-05-24T13:06:46.000Z},
 file_attached = {true},
 profile_id = {b3012b7e-6b18-3e87-a6ca-1357ce23063d},
 group_id = {f84f96bc-73de-3c3e-befe-041dabceaf3c},
 last_modified = {2018-05-24T13:52:08.976Z},
 read = {false},
 starred = {false},
 authored = {false},
 confirmed = {false},
 hidden = {false},
 folder_uuids = {936b7a49-1c3a-454c-91fb-8138fa4fd8f7},
 private_publication = {false},
 abstract = {Ocean circulation models are frequently used in maritime Search and Rescue operations due to their skill in simulating the effects of local currents on the transport of people or objects. They are also occasionally used in forensic contexts. Frequently, positively or neutrally buoyant passive particles are used in these simulations, as a proxy for the ‘objects’ in the study. In this paper, the adequacy of passive particle model simulations is tested in an attempt to reproduce the drift of a real case situation. The case study consists of a drowning accident in which the drift was ~2 km for a post-mortem submersion interval (PMSI) of 8.6 days. The simula- tion results highlighted the limitation of the methodology to predict the correct drift. However, we discuss the shortcomings of the modelling approach, and suggest ways to improve the skill of such numerical tools in predicting body drift after drowning accidents.},
 bibtype = {article},
 author = {Mateus, Marcos and Pinto, Ligia and Chambel-Leitaõ, Paulo},
 journal = {Australian Journal of Forensic Sciences}
}
Downloads: 0