Dronabinol for chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting unresponsive to antiemetics. May, M., B. & Glode, A., E. Cancer Management and Research, 8:49-55, 2016.
Dronabinol for chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting unresponsive to antiemetics [pdf]Paper  abstract   bibtex   
Abstract: Chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) is one of the most common\r\nsymptoms feared by patients, but may be prevented or lessened with appropriate medications.\r\nSeveral antiemetic options exist to manage CINV. Corticosteroids, serotonin receptor antagonists,\r\nand neurokinin receptor antagonists are the classes most commonly used in the prevention of\r\nCINV. There are many alternative drug classes utilized for the prevention and management of\r\nCINV such as antihistamines, benzodiazepines, anticonvulsants, cannabinoids, and dopamine\r\nreceptor antagonists. Medications belonging to these classes generally have lower efficacy and\r\nare associated with more adverse effects. They are also not as well studied compared to the\r\naforementioned agents. This review will focus on dronabinol, a member of the cannabinoid\r\nclass, and its role in CINV. Cannabis sativa L. (also known as marijuana) contains naturally\r\noccurring delta-9-tetrahydrocannibinol (delta-9-THC). The synthetic version of delta-9-THC is\r\nthe active ingredient in dronabinol that makes dronabinol an orally active cannabinoid. Evidence\r\nfor clinical efficacy of dronabinol will be analyzed in this review as monotherapy, in combination\r\nwith ondansetron, and in combination with prochlorperazine.\r\nKeywords: dronabinol, cannabinoids, antiemetic, chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting
@article{
 title = {Dronabinol for chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting unresponsive to antiemetics},
 type = {article},
 year = {2016},
 identifiers = {[object Object]},
 keywords = {Antiemetic,Cannabinoids,Chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting,Dronabinol},
 pages = {49-55},
 volume = {8},
 id = {76ad1fbe-51cd-3331-a316-e661273dbe56},
 created = {2017-03-12T23:07:09.000Z},
 file_attached = {true},
 profile_id = {32112794-3515-31de-a0a8-eabadccd1b7c},
 group_id = {4cb6f261-be0d-3474-9ccf-7abee0d15aec},
 last_modified = {2017-03-21T10:42:52.453Z},
 read = {false},
 starred = {false},
 authored = {false},
 confirmed = {true},
 hidden = {false},
 notes = {NULL},
 folder_uuids = {92ca528e-95ee-47e6-8651-c405c4a49761},
 private_publication = {false},
 abstract = {Abstract: Chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) is one of the most common\r\nsymptoms feared by patients, but may be prevented or lessened with appropriate medications.\r\nSeveral antiemetic options exist to manage CINV. Corticosteroids, serotonin receptor antagonists,\r\nand neurokinin receptor antagonists are the classes most commonly used in the prevention of\r\nCINV. There are many alternative drug classes utilized for the prevention and management of\r\nCINV such as antihistamines, benzodiazepines, anticonvulsants, cannabinoids, and dopamine\r\nreceptor antagonists. Medications belonging to these classes generally have lower efficacy and\r\nare associated with more adverse effects. They are also not as well studied compared to the\r\naforementioned agents. This review will focus on dronabinol, a member of the cannabinoid\r\nclass, and its role in CINV. Cannabis sativa L. (also known as marijuana) contains naturally\r\noccurring delta-9-tetrahydrocannibinol (delta-9-THC). The synthetic version of delta-9-THC is\r\nthe active ingredient in dronabinol that makes dronabinol an orally active cannabinoid. Evidence\r\nfor clinical efficacy of dronabinol will be analyzed in this review as monotherapy, in combination\r\nwith ondansetron, and in combination with prochlorperazine.\r\nKeywords: dronabinol, cannabinoids, antiemetic, chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting},
 bibtype = {article},
 author = {May, Megan Brafford and Glode, Ashley E.},
 journal = {Cancer Management and Research}
}
Downloads: 0