Breastfeeding and maternal alcohol use: Prevalence and effects on child outcomes and fetal alcohol spectrum disorders. May, P., A., Hasken, J., M., Blankenship, J., Marais, A., Joubert, B., Cloete, M., de Vries, M., M., Barnard, R., Botha, I., Roux, S., Doms, C., Gossage, J., P., Kalberg, W., O., Buckley, D., Robinson, L., K., Adnams, C., M., Manning, M., A., Parry, C., D., H., Hoyme, H., E., Tabachnick, B., & Seedat, S. Reproductive Toxicology (Elmsford, N.Y.), 63:13-21, 2016.
Breastfeeding and maternal alcohol use: Prevalence and effects on child outcomes and fetal alcohol spectrum disorders [link]Website  abstract   bibtex   
OBJECTIVE: Determine any effects that maternal alcohol consumption during the breastfeeding period has on child outcomes. METHODS: Population-based samples of children with fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD), normally-developing children, and their mothers were analyzed for differences in child outcomes. RESULTS: Ninety percent (90%) of mothers breastfed for an average of 19.9 months. Of mothers who drank postpartum and breastfed (MDPB), 47% breastfed for 12 months or more. In case control analyses, children of MDPB were significantly lighter, had lower verbal IQ scores, and more anomalies in comparisons controlling for prenatal alcohol exposure and final FASD diagnosis. Utilizing a stepwise logistic regression model adjusting for nine confounders of prenatal drinking and other maternal risks, MDPB were 6.4 times more likely to have a child with FASD than breastfeeding mothers who abstained from alcohol while breastfeeding. CONCLUSIONS: Alcohol use during the period of breastfeeding was found to significantly compromise a child's development.
@article{
 title = {Breastfeeding and maternal alcohol use: Prevalence and effects on child outcomes and fetal alcohol spectrum disorders},
 type = {article},
 year = {2016},
 identifiers = {[object Object]},
 keywords = {Adult,Alcohol,Alcohol Drinking,Breast Feeding,Breastfeeding,Child,Child Development,Child health and development,Ethanol,Female,Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders,Fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD),Humans,Intelligence Tests,Maternal Exposure,Mothers,Pregnancy,Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects,Prevalence,South Africa},
 pages = {13-21},
 volume = {63},
 websites = {http://files/1201/May et al. - 2016 - Breastfeeding and maternal alcohol use Prevalence.pdf,http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27174445},
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 created = {2020-09-17T09:28:00.385Z},
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 last_modified = {2020-09-17T09:28:00.385Z},
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 language = {eng},
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 abstract = {OBJECTIVE: Determine any effects that maternal alcohol consumption during the breastfeeding period has on child outcomes. METHODS: Population-based samples of children with fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD), normally-developing children, and their mothers were analyzed for differences in child outcomes. RESULTS: Ninety percent (90%) of mothers breastfed for an average of 19.9 months. Of mothers who drank postpartum and breastfed (MDPB), 47% breastfed for 12 months or more. In case control analyses, children of MDPB were significantly lighter, had lower verbal IQ scores, and more anomalies in comparisons controlling for prenatal alcohol exposure and final FASD diagnosis. Utilizing a stepwise logistic regression model adjusting for nine confounders of prenatal drinking and other maternal risks, MDPB were 6.4 times more likely to have a child with FASD than breastfeeding mothers who abstained from alcohol while breastfeeding. CONCLUSIONS: Alcohol use during the period of breastfeeding was found to significantly compromise a child's development.},
 bibtype = {article},
 author = {May, Philip A and Hasken, Julie M and Blankenship, Jason and Marais, Anna-Susan and Joubert, Belinda and Cloete, Marise and de Vries, Marlene M and Barnard, Ronel and Botha, Isobel and Roux, Sumien and Doms, Cate and Gossage, J Phillip and Kalberg, Wendy O and Buckley, David and Robinson, Luther K and Adnams, Colleen M and Manning, Melanie A and Parry, Charles D H and Hoyme, H Eugene and Tabachnick, Barbara and Seedat, Soraya},
 journal = {Reproductive Toxicology (Elmsford, N.Y.)}
}
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