Prevalence and patterns of potentially avoidable hospitalizations in the US long-term care setting. McAndrew, R., M.; Grabowski, D., C.; Dangi, A.; and Young, G., J. International journal for quality in health care : journal of the International Society for Quality in Health Care / ISQua, . Published by Oxford University Press in association with the International Society for Quality in Health Care; all rights reserved, 12, 2015.
abstract   bibtex   
OBJECTIVE: We examined the magnitude and related costs of potentially avoidable hospitalizations including re-hospitalizations for long-stay residents in nursing homes. DESIGN: We conducted our investigation as a retrospective cohort study where the cohort comprised individuals who were eligible for Medicare and had spent at least 120 uninterrupted days in a nursing home in New York State between 2004 and 2007. To conduct the study, we linked the Minimum Data Set, Medicare Provider Assessment File and Provider of Service File. MEASUREMENTS: We defined a potentially avoidable hospitalization as one where a resident was admitted to a hospital for which the principle diagnosis was 1 of 15 ambulatory care sensitive (ACS) conditions. RESULTS: Although the percentage of total hospitalizations for ACS conditions declined during the study period, 20% or more of annual hospitalizations were for ACS conditions entailing Medicare payments in excess of $450 million. Approximately 40% of the residents who were hospitalized once for an ACS condition were re-hospitalized during the study period for the same or different ACS condition. CONCLUSION: During the study period, potentially avoidable hospitalizations from nursing homes were a common occurrence in New York. A substantial percentage of such hospitalizations involved residents who had been previously hospitalized, in some cases multiple times, for an ACS condition. Although the observed decline in ACS-related hospitalizations suggests improvements in nursing home care, various policy and managerial-level initiatives may be needed to ensure that nursing home residents are not exposed to a substantial risk of avoidable hospitalizations in the future.
@article{
 title = {Prevalence and patterns of potentially avoidable hospitalizations in the US long-term care setting},
 type = {article},
 year = {2015},
 identifiers = {[object Object]},
 keywords = {long-term care,nursing homes,potentially avoidable hospitalizations},
 month = {12},
 publisher = {. Published by Oxford University Press in association with the International Society for Quality in Health Care; all rights reserved},
 day = {23},
 city = {Northeastern University Center for Health Policy and Healthcare Research, Boston, USA.; Harvard Medical School, Boston, USA.; Northeastern University Center for Health Policy and Healthcare Research, Boston, USA.; Northeastern University Center for Health},
 id = {c4b0ee24-9be9-3b63-bbe0-0ccb0186a056},
 created = {2016-08-20T16:55:46.000Z},
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 last_modified = {2017-03-14T09:54:45.334Z},
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 source_type = {JOUR},
 notes = {LR: 20151226; CI: (c) The Author 2015; JID: 9434628; OTO: NOTNLM; aheadofprint},
 folder_uuids = {3f8d7ce1-e3f4-4c64-add9-a1fb30f8c887},
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 abstract = {OBJECTIVE: We examined the magnitude and related costs of potentially avoidable hospitalizations including re-hospitalizations for long-stay residents in nursing homes. DESIGN: We conducted our investigation as a retrospective cohort study where the cohort comprised individuals who were eligible for Medicare and had spent at least 120 uninterrupted days in a nursing home in New York State between 2004 and 2007. To conduct the study, we linked the Minimum Data Set, Medicare Provider Assessment File and Provider of Service File. MEASUREMENTS: We defined a potentially avoidable hospitalization as one where a resident was admitted to a hospital for which the principle diagnosis was 1 of 15 ambulatory care sensitive (ACS) conditions. RESULTS: Although the percentage of total hospitalizations for ACS conditions declined during the study period, 20% or more of annual hospitalizations were for ACS conditions entailing Medicare payments in excess of $450 million. Approximately 40% of the residents who were hospitalized once for an ACS condition were re-hospitalized during the study period for the same or different ACS condition. CONCLUSION: During the study period, potentially avoidable hospitalizations from nursing homes were a common occurrence in New York. A substantial percentage of such hospitalizations involved residents who had been previously hospitalized, in some cases multiple times, for an ACS condition. Although the observed decline in ACS-related hospitalizations suggests improvements in nursing home care, various policy and managerial-level initiatives may be needed to ensure that nursing home residents are not exposed to a substantial risk of avoidable hospitalizations in the future.},
 bibtype = {article},
 author = {McAndrew, R M and Grabowski, D C and Dangi, A and Young, G J},
 journal = {International journal for quality in health care : journal of the International Society for Quality in Health Care / ISQua}
}
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