Environmental and vegetation controls on the spatial variability of CH<inf>4</inf> emission from wet-sedge and tussock tundra ecosystems in the Arctic. McEwing, K.; Fisher, J.; and Zona, D. Plant and Soil, 2015.
abstract   bibtex   
© 2015, The Author(s). Aims: Despite multiple studies investigating the environmental controls on CH 4 fluxes from arctic tundra ecosystems, the high spatial variability of CH 4 emissions is not fully understood. This makes the upscaling of CH 4 fluxes from plot to regional scale, particularly challenging. The goal of this study is to refine our knowledge of the spatial variability and controls on CH 4 emission from tundra ecosystems. Methods: CH 4 fluxes were measured in four sites across a variety of wet-sedge and tussock tundra ecosystems in Alaska using chambers and a Los Gatos CO 2 and CH 4 gas analyser. Results: All sites were found to be sources of CH 4 , with northern sites (in Barrow) showing similar CH 4 emission rates to the southernmost site (ca. 300 km south, Ivotuk). Gross primary productivity (GPP), water level and soil temperature were the most important environmental controls on CH 4 emission. Greater vascular plant cover was linked with higher CH 4 emission, but this increased emission with increased vascular plant cover was much higher (86 %) in the drier sites, than the wettest sites (30 %), suggesting that transport and/or substrate availability were crucial limiting factors for CH 4 emission in these tundra ecosystems. Conclusions: Overall, this study provides an increased understanding of the fine scale spatial controls on CH 4 flux, in particular the key role that plant cover and GPP play in enhancing CH 4 emissions from tundra soils.
@article{
 title = {Environmental and vegetation controls on the spatial variability of CH<inf>4</inf> emission from wet-sedge and tussock tundra ecosystems in the Arctic},
 type = {article},
 year = {2015},
 identifiers = {[object Object]},
 keywords = {Arctic,Climate change,Greenhouse gas emission,Permafrost,Vegetation control},
 volume = {388},
 id = {8858f1e6-4a0a-3fc3-a88a-538bbd663414},
 created = {2018-04-05T23:20:52.441Z},
 file_attached = {false},
 profile_id = {93cc1067-253c-3a94-87b0-452b9c9fc1b9},
 last_modified = {2018-04-05T23:20:52.441Z},
 read = {false},
 starred = {false},
 authored = {true},
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 abstract = {© 2015, The Author(s). Aims: Despite multiple studies investigating the environmental controls on CH 4  fluxes from arctic tundra ecosystems, the high spatial variability of CH 4  emissions is not fully understood. This makes the upscaling of CH 4  fluxes from plot to regional scale, particularly challenging. The goal of this study is to refine our knowledge of the spatial variability and controls on CH 4  emission from tundra ecosystems. Methods: CH 4  fluxes were measured in four sites across a variety of wet-sedge and tussock tundra ecosystems in Alaska using chambers and a Los Gatos CO 2  and CH 4  gas analyser. Results: All sites were found to be sources of CH 4 , with northern sites (in Barrow) showing similar CH 4  emission rates to the southernmost site (ca. 300 km south, Ivotuk). Gross primary productivity (GPP), water level and soil temperature were the most important environmental controls on CH 4  emission. Greater vascular plant cover was linked with higher CH 4  emission, but this increased emission with increased vascular plant cover was much higher (86 %) in the drier sites, than the wettest sites (30 %), suggesting that transport and/or substrate availability were crucial limiting factors for CH 4  emission in these tundra ecosystems. Conclusions: Overall, this study provides an increased understanding of the fine scale spatial controls on CH 4  flux, in particular the key role that plant cover and GPP play in enhancing CH 4  emissions from tundra soils.},
 bibtype = {article},
 author = {McEwing, K.R. and Fisher, J.P. and Zona, D.},
 journal = {Plant and Soil},
 number = {1-2}
}
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