Spirituality, religion, and aging: Clinical geropsychology and aging people's need for meaning. McFadden, S. H. In Lichtenberg, P. A.; Mast, B. T.; Carpenter, B. D.; and Loebach Wetherell, J., editors, APA handbook of clinical geropsychology, Vol. 1: History and status of the field and perspectives on aging, of APA handbooks in psychology, pages 473--496, Chapter xx, 631 Pages. American Psychological Association, Washington, DC, 2015. DOI: 10.1037/14458-020
Spirituality, religion, and aging: Clinical geropsychology and aging people's need for meaning [link]Paper  abstract   bibtex   
Peter Coleman (2009), whose studies of religion, spirituality, and aging have spanned more than 40 years, has stated that despite the fact that religion has traditionally been a bulwark against the many challenges of aging, older people know when they are not wanted or are taken for granted. Thus, some have joined young and middle-aged people in the exodus from institutional religion (Altemeyer, 2004). In light of the diverse ways people approach religion and spirituality, the many forms of belief systems they embrace, the variety of religious and spiritual experiences people bring to late life, and the cultural cacophony about religiousness and spirituality in places such as the United States, it is both daunting and necessary for clinical geropsychologists to consider this topic. Under Principle E, Respect for People’s Rights and Dignity, of the American Psychological Association���s (APA’s; 2010) Ethical Principles of Psychologists and Code of Conduct, one finds a list of 12 cultural, individual, and role differences about which psychologists are to be knowledgeable and toward which they must show respect. Buried in the list, between national origin and sexual orientation, one finds religion. In this chapter, I illustrate how all the human variability cited by the APA comes into play when considering religiousness and spirituality. In this chapter, I begin by addressing definitional issues. I then examine cross-disciplinary developments in the late 20th and early 21st centuries, changes in the religious landscape and in the discipline of psychology, and conceptual developments in gerontology and the psychology of religion that have clinical implications for work with older people. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved) (Source: chapter)
@incollection{mcfadden_spirituality_2015,
	series = {{APA} handbooks in psychology},
	title = {Spirituality, religion, and aging: {Clinical} geropsychology and aging people's need for meaning},
	url = {http://uml.idm.oclc.org/login?url=https://search.proquest.com/docview/1653146203?accountid=14569},
	abstract = {Peter Coleman (2009), whose studies of religion, spirituality, and aging have spanned more than 40 years, has stated that despite the fact that religion has traditionally been a bulwark against the many challenges of aging, older people know when they are not wanted or are taken for granted. Thus, some have joined young and middle-aged people in the exodus from institutional religion (Altemeyer, 2004). In light of the diverse ways people approach religion and spirituality, the many forms of belief systems they embrace, the variety of religious and spiritual experiences people bring to late life, and the cultural cacophony about religiousness and spirituality in places such as the United States, it is both daunting and necessary for clinical geropsychologists to consider this topic. Under Principle E, Respect for People’s Rights and Dignity, of the American Psychological Association���s (APA’s; 2010) Ethical Principles of Psychologists and Code of Conduct, one finds a list of 12 cultural, individual, and role differences about which psychologists are to be knowledgeable and toward which they must show respect. Buried in the list, between national origin and sexual orientation, one finds religion. In this chapter, I illustrate how all the human variability cited by the APA comes into play when considering religiousness and spirituality. In this chapter, I begin by addressing definitional issues. I then examine cross-disciplinary developments in the late 20th and early 21st centuries, changes in the religious landscape and in the discipline of psychology, and conceptual developments in gerontology and the psychology of religion that have clinical implications for work with older people. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved)
(Source: chapter)},
	language = {English},
	booktitle = {{APA} handbook of clinical geropsychology, {Vol}. 1: {History} and status of the field and perspectives on aging},
	publisher = {American Psychological Association, Washington, DC},
	author = {McFadden, Susan H.},
	editor = {Lichtenberg, Peter A. and Mast, Benjamin T. and Carpenter, Brian D. and Loebach Wetherell, Julie},
	year = {2015},
	note = {DOI: 10.1037/14458-020},
	keywords = {2860:Gerontology, Adulthood (18 yrs \& older), Aged (65 yrs \& older), Aging, Clinical Practice, Geropsychology, Human, Psychology: Professional \& Research, Religion, Spirituality, aging, bookitem, clinical geropsychology, religion, spirituality},
	pages = {473--496, Chapter xx, 631 Pages}
}
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