Using cardiac output monitoring to guide perioperative haemodynamic therapy. McGuinness, S. and Parke, R. Current Opinion in Critical Care, 2015. Number: 4
Using cardiac output monitoring to guide perioperative haemodynamic therapy [link]Paper  abstract   bibtex   
Purpose of review The aim of this study was to review recent advances and evidence for the use of cardiac output monitors to guide perioperative haemodynamic therapy. Recent findings There are multiple different cardiac output monitoring devices available for clinical use which are coupled with many different intervention protocols to manipulate perioperative haemodynamics. There is little evidence to demonstrate superiority of any one device. Previous small studies and meta-analyses have suggested that perioperative haemodynamic therapy guided by cardiac output monitoring improves outcomes after major surgery. Despite relatively low-quality evidence several national bodies have recommended ‘perioperative goal-directed therapy' (GDT) as a standard of care. Recent larger trials of GDT have mostly failed to prove a benefit of GDT and one explanation for this is the increased quality of usual care that may be occurring because of initiatives such as enhanced recovery after surgery and the WHO Safer Surgery programmes. Summary Perioperative GDT remains an exciting intervention to reduce significant morbidity following major surgery; however, it is not yet a proven standard of care. Further large pragmatic trials are required to demonstrate its effectiveness particularly in the era of enhanced recovery after surgery programmes.
@article{mcguinness_using_2015,
	title = {Using cardiac output monitoring to guide perioperative haemodynamic therapy},
	volume = {21},
	issn = {1070-5295},
	url = {https://journals.lww.com/co-criticalcare/Fulltext/2015/08000/Using_cardiac_output_monitoring_to_guide.15.aspx},
	abstract = {Purpose of review The aim of this study was to review recent advances and evidence for the use of cardiac output monitors to guide perioperative haemodynamic therapy. Recent findings There are multiple different cardiac output monitoring devices available for clinical use which are coupled with many different intervention protocols to manipulate perioperative haemodynamics. There is little evidence to demonstrate superiority of any one device. Previous small studies and meta-analyses have suggested that perioperative haemodynamic therapy guided by cardiac output monitoring improves outcomes after major surgery. Despite relatively low-quality evidence several national bodies have recommended ‘perioperative goal-directed therapy' (GDT) as a standard of care. Recent larger trials of GDT have mostly failed to prove a benefit of GDT and one explanation for this is the increased quality of usual care that may be occurring because of initiatives such as enhanced recovery after surgery and the WHO Safer Surgery programmes. Summary Perioperative GDT remains an exciting intervention to reduce significant morbidity following major surgery; however, it is not yet a proven standard of care. Further large pragmatic trials are required to demonstrate its effectiveness particularly in the era of enhanced recovery after surgery programmes.},
	number = {4},
	journal = {Current Opinion in Critical Care},
	author = {McGuinness, Shay and Parke, Rachael},
	year = {2015},
	note = {Number: 4},
	keywords = {cardiac output monitoring, goal directed therapy, haemodynamic optimization, perioperative care},
}
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