Recruitment of Older Adults: Success May Be in the Details. McHenry, J., C.; Insel, K., C.; Einstein, G., O.; Vidrine, A., N.; Koerner, K., M.; and Morrow, D., G. The Gerontologist, 55(5):845-853, . Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America, 10, 2015.
abstract   bibtex   
PURPOSE: Describe recruitment strategies used in a randomized clinical trial of a behavioral prospective memory intervention to improve medication adherence for older adults taking antihypertensive medication. RESULTS: Recruitment strategies represent 4 themes: accessing an appropriate population, communication and trust-building, providing comfort and security, and expressing gratitude. Recruitment activities resulted in 276 participants with a mean age of 76.32 years, and study enrollment included 207 women, 69 men, and 54 persons representing ethnic minorities. Recruitment success was linked to cultivating relationships with community-based organizations, face-to-face contact with potential study participants, and providing service (e.g., blood pressure checks) as an access point to eligible participants. Seventy-two percent of potential participants who completed a follow-up call and met eligibility criteria were enrolled in the study. The attrition rate was 14.34%. IMPLICATIONS: The projected increase in the number of older adults intensifies the need to study interventions that improve health outcomes. The challenge is to recruit sufficient numbers of participants who are also representative of older adults to test these interventions. Failing to recruit a sufficient and representative sample can compromise statistical power and the generalizability of study findings.
@article{
 title = {Recruitment of Older Adults: Success May Be in the Details},
 type = {article},
 year = {2015},
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 keywords = {Communication,Community-based organizations,Face to face,Trust},
 pages = {845-853},
 volume = {55},
 month = {10},
 publisher = {. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America},
 city = {College of Nursing, University of Arizona Tucson jmchenry@nursing.arizona.edu.; College of Nursing, University of Arizona Tucson.; Department of Psychology, Furman University Greenville, South Carolina.; College of Nursing, University of Arizona Tucson.; },
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 notes = {LR: 20151006; CI: (c) The Author 2012; GR: R01 NR010350/NR/NINR NIH HHS/United States; JID: 0375327; OID: NLM: PMC4592329 [Available on 10/01/16]; OTO: NOTNLM; PMCR: 2016/10/01 00:00; 2012/03/30 [received]; 2012/05/02 [accepted]; 2012/08/16 [aheadofprint]; ppublish},
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 abstract = {PURPOSE: Describe recruitment strategies used in a randomized clinical trial of a behavioral prospective memory intervention to improve medication adherence for older adults taking antihypertensive medication. RESULTS: Recruitment strategies represent 4 themes: accessing an appropriate population, communication and trust-building, providing comfort and security, and expressing gratitude. Recruitment activities resulted in 276 participants with a mean age of 76.32 years, and study enrollment included 207 women, 69 men, and 54 persons representing ethnic minorities. Recruitment success was linked to cultivating relationships with community-based organizations, face-to-face contact with potential study participants, and providing service (e.g., blood pressure checks) as an access point to eligible participants. Seventy-two percent of potential participants who completed a follow-up call and met eligibility criteria were enrolled in the study. The attrition rate was 14.34%. IMPLICATIONS: The projected increase in the number of older adults intensifies the need to study interventions that improve health outcomes. The challenge is to recruit sufficient numbers of participants who are also representative of older adults to test these interventions. Failing to recruit a sufficient and representative sample can compromise statistical power and the generalizability of study findings.},
 bibtype = {article},
 author = {McHenry, J C and Insel, K C and Einstein, G O and Vidrine, A N and Koerner, K M and Morrow, D G},
 journal = {The Gerontologist},
 number = {5}
}
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