Sexuality and older women: Desirability and desire. McHugh, M. C. and Interligi, C. In Muhlbauer, V.; Chrisler, J. C.; and Denmark, F. L., editors, Women and aging: An international, intersectional power perspective, pages 89--116, Chapter xvi, 172 Pages. Springer International Publishing, Cham, 2015. DOI: 10.1007/978-3-319-09306-2_6
Sexuality and older women: Desirability and desire [link]Paper  abstract   bibtex   
Despite the unrelenting forms of ageism in contemporary society, ageism has been "under theorized and under-researched within the socio-cultural literature" (Clarke 2011, p. 2). People, including women's studies scholars, tend to ignore ageism until they themselves become old (Calasanti and Slevin 2001). The limited theorizing of ageism reflects an androcentric emphasis on age discrimination against older workers and rarely considers the centrality of appearance concerns to ageism or the embodied nature of older women's experiences (Clarke 2011). The research concerning older women's sense of their appearance, their bodies, or themselves as sexual beings is sparse. There is evidence (Calasanti and Slevin 2001; Clarke 2011; Lemish and Muhlbauer 2012) that contemporary beauty ideals and cultural stereotypes about old women combine to undermine older women's sense of their own desirability; however, there are also indications (Clarke 2011; Slevin 2006) that women's experience of their own sexual desire and desirability are more complex, contextual, and even contradictory. Older women around the world are known to have sexual desire and to engage in sexual activity (Lusti-Narasimhan and Beard 2013). In our discussion of the sexual desirability and desire of older women, we acknowledge the varied and complex perspectives that older women have on their bodies, their appearance, and their sexual selves. We attempt to address the impact of contextual factors on women's experience of themselves as sexual beings, including the larger sociohistorical context of their lives and the particular context in which they experience sexual desire, such as the availability of a partner and the quality of their relationships. In addition to examining the impact of ageist perspectives on older women, we examine the degree to which older women themselves may voice ageist attitudes. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved) (Source: chapter)
@incollection{mchugh_sexuality_2015,
	title = {Sexuality and older women: {Desirability} and desire},
	url = {http://uml.idm.oclc.org/login?url=https://search.proquest.com/docview/1666307812?accountid=14569},
	abstract = {Despite the unrelenting forms of ageism in contemporary society, ageism has been "under theorized and under-researched within the socio-cultural literature" (Clarke 2011, p. 2). People, including women's studies scholars, tend to ignore ageism until they themselves become old (Calasanti and Slevin 2001). The limited theorizing of ageism reflects an androcentric emphasis on age discrimination against older workers and rarely considers the centrality of appearance concerns to ageism or the embodied nature of older women's experiences (Clarke 2011). The research concerning older women's sense of their appearance, their bodies, or themselves as sexual beings is sparse. There is evidence (Calasanti and Slevin 2001; Clarke 2011; Lemish and Muhlbauer 2012) that contemporary beauty ideals and cultural stereotypes about old women combine to undermine older women's sense of their own desirability; however, there are also indications (Clarke 2011; Slevin 2006) that women's experience of their own sexual desire and desirability are more complex, contextual, and even contradictory. Older women around the world are known to have sexual desire and to engage in sexual activity (Lusti-Narasimhan and Beard 2013). In our discussion of the sexual desirability and desire of older women, we acknowledge the varied and complex perspectives that older women have on their bodies, their appearance, and their sexual selves. We attempt to address the impact of contextual factors on women's experience of themselves as sexual beings, including the larger sociohistorical context of their lives and the particular context in which they experience sexual desire, such as the availability of a partner and the quality of their relationships. In addition to examining the impact of ageist perspectives on older women, we examine the degree to which older women themselves may voice ageist attitudes. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved)
(Source: chapter)},
	language = {English},
	booktitle = {Women and aging: {An} international, intersectional power perspective},
	publisher = {Springer International Publishing, Cham},
	author = {McHugh, Maureen C. and Interligi, Camille},
	editor = {Muhlbauer, Varda and Chrisler, Joan C. and Denmark, Florence L.},
	year = {2015},
	note = {DOI: 10.1007/978-3-319-09306-2\_6},
	keywords = {2860:Gerontology, Adult Attitudes, Adulthood (18 yrs \& older), Aged (65 yrs \& older), Ageism, Desire, Female, History, Human, Human Females, Interpersonal Relationships, Psychology: Professional \& Research, Sex Role Attitudes, Sexual Partners, Sexuality, Sociocultural Factors, ageism, bookitem, older women, older women's perspectives, relationships, sexual desire, sexual partners, sexuality, sociohistorical context},
	pages = {89--116, Chapter xvi, 172 Pages}
}
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