Frailty as a Predictor of Institutionalization Among Adults With Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities. McKenzie, K., Ouellette-Kuntz, H., & Martin, L. Intellectual And Developmental Disabilities, 54(2):123-135, American Association on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities, 2016.
Frailty as a Predictor of Institutionalization Among Adults With Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities [link]Website  abstract   bibtex   
Adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) frequently become frail earlier than the general population, resulting in higher care needs. This population is at risk for institutionalization, or re-institutionalization, into long-term care (LTC). Using a retrospective cohort design to follow 3,034 individuals (18-99 years) living in Ontario, Canada, and assessed with the Resident Assessment Instrument-Home Care, individuals were characterized with a frailty index (FI) for persons with IDD. Survival analyses determined differences in rates of admission to LTC and survival in the community. Frail individuals had greater rates of admission than non-frail individuals, adjusted HR = 2.19, 95% CI 1.81, 2.64]. The FI predicts institutionalization.;
@article{
 title = {Frailty as a Predictor of Institutionalization Among Adults With Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities},
 type = {article},
 year = {2016},
 identifiers = {[object Object]},
 keywords = {RAI-HC,aging,developmental disabilities,frailty,institutionalization,intellectual disabilities,long-term care},
 pages = {123-135},
 volume = {54},
 websites = {http://login.ezproxy.library.ualberta.ca/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=cmedm&AN=27028254&site=ehost-live&scope=site},
 publisher = {American Association on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities},
 city = {Katherine McKenzie, Department of Public Health Sciences, Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario, Canada;; Hélène Ouellette-Kuntz, Department of Public Health Sciences, Queen's University & Ongwanada, Kingston, Ontario, Canada; and.; Lynn Martin, Departmen},
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 notes = {ID: 27028254; Accession Number: 27028254. Language: English. Date Created: 20160331. Update Code: 20160331. Publication Type: Journal Article. Journal ID: 101299965. Publication Model: Print. Cited Medium: Internet. NLM ISO Abbr: Intellect Dev Disabil. Linking ISSN: 19349491. Subset: In-Data-Review; IM; Date of Electronic Publication: 20160401. ; Original Imprints: Publication: Washington, DC : American Association on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities},
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 abstract = {Adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) frequently become frail earlier than the general population, resulting in higher care needs. This population is at risk for institutionalization, or re-institutionalization, into long-term care (LTC). Using a retrospective cohort design to follow 3,034 individuals (18-99 years) living in Ontario, Canada, and assessed with the Resident Assessment Instrument-Home Care, individuals were characterized with a frailty index (FI) for persons with IDD. Survival analyses determined differences in rates of admission to LTC and survival in the community. Frail individuals had greater rates of admission than non-frail individuals, adjusted HR = 2.19, 95% CI 1.81, 2.64]. The FI predicts institutionalization.;},
 bibtype = {article},
 author = {McKenzie, Katherine and Ouellette-Kuntz, H and Martin, Lynn},
 journal = {Intellectual And Developmental Disabilities},
 number = {2}
}
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