Imaging of Ancient Egyptian Animal Mummies. McKnight, L.; Atherton-Woolham, S.; and Adams, J. Radiographics : a review publication of the Radiological Society of North America, Inc, 35(7):2108--2120, 2015.
Imaging of Ancient Egyptian Animal Mummies [link]Paper  abstract   bibtex   
Human mummies have long been studied by using imaging as a primary investigative method. Mummified animal remains from ancient Egypt are less well researched, yet much can be learned about species diversity and the methods of preservation. Noninvasive imaging methods enable mummy bundles to remain intact, with no detrimental physical effects, thus ensuring protection of a valuable archaeological resource. This article is based on the research experience gathered during 13 years (2000-2012) with 152 animal mummies held in the collections of 17 museums in the United Kingdom. Conventional radiography, computed radiography, digital radiography, and computed tomography (CT) available in the clinical setting were used to assess the value of each imaging modality in the study of animal mummies and related material. Radiography proved to be an excellent research method that provided initial insight into the contents of the mummy bundle, and CT contributed additional useful detail in some cases. Paleoradiologic analyses enabled information on mummy bundle contents to be proved, including the nature of the skeletal remains and the methods of mummification. An optimum method involving radiography and CT is described.
@article{mcknight_imaging_2015,
	title = {Imaging of {Ancient} {Egyptian} {Animal} {Mummies}},
	volume = {35},
	issn = {1527-1323},
	url = {http://www.embase.com/search/results?subaction=viewrecord&from=export&id=L612250465},
	abstract = {Human mummies have long been studied by using imaging as a primary investigative method. Mummified animal remains from ancient Egypt are less well researched, yet much can be learned about species diversity and the methods of preservation. Noninvasive imaging methods enable mummy bundles to remain intact, with no detrimental physical effects, thus ensuring protection of a valuable archaeological resource. This article is based on the research experience gathered during 13 years (2000-2012) with 152 animal mummies held in the collections of 17 museums in the United Kingdom. Conventional radiography, computed radiography, digital radiography, and computed tomography (CT) available in the clinical setting were used to assess the value of each imaging modality in the study of animal mummies and related material. Radiography proved to be an excellent research method that provided initial insight into the contents of the mummy bundle, and CT contributed additional useful detail in some cases. Paleoradiologic analyses enabled information on mummy bundle contents to be proved, including the nature of the skeletal remains and the methods of mummification. An optimum method involving radiography and CT is described.},
	number = {7},
	journal = {Radiographics : a review publication of the Radiological Society of North America, Inc},
	author = {McKnight, L.M. and Atherton-Woolham, S.D. and Adams, J.E.},
	year = {2015},
	keywords = {Egypt, animal, bone age, cause of death, computer assisted tomography, history, image enhancement, information center, paleopathology, pet animal, posthumous care, procedures, radiography, religion, retrospective study, veterinary},
	pages = {2108--2120}
}
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