Applying behavioral theories to invasive animal management: Towards an integrated framework. McLeod, L. J.; Hine, D. W.; Please, P. M.; and Driver, A. B. Journal of Environmental Management, 161:63--71, September, 2015.
Applying behavioral theories to invasive animal management: Towards an integrated framework [link]Paper  doi  abstract   bibtex   
Invasive species wreak an estimated \$1.4 trillion in damages globally, each year. To have any hope of reducing this damage, best-practice control strategies must incorporate behavior change interventions. Traditional interventions, based on the knowledge-transfer model, assume that if land managers are properly educated about risks and strategies, they will develop supportive attitudes and implement appropriate control strategies. However, the social sciences have produced a large number of behavioral models and frameworks that demonstrate that knowledge transfer, by itself, fails to change behavior. The challenge then lies in knowing which behavioral model to choose, and when, from a potentially overwhelming ‘universe’. In this paper, we review nine behavior theories relevant to invasive species management. We then introduce the Behavior Change Wheel as a tool for integrating these theories into a single practical framework. This framework links drivers of and barriers to behavior change with intervention strategies and policies, in what we consider, from an applied perspective, to be an important advance.
@article{mcleod_applying_2015,
	title = {Applying behavioral theories to invasive animal management: {Towards} an integrated framework},
	volume = {161},
	issn = {0301-4797},
	shorttitle = {Applying behavioral theories to invasive animal management},
	url = {http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0301479715301390},
	doi = {10.1016/j.jenvman.2015.06.048},
	abstract = {Invasive species wreak an estimated \$1.4 trillion in damages globally, each year. To have any hope of reducing this damage, best-practice control strategies must incorporate behavior change interventions. Traditional interventions, based on the knowledge-transfer model, assume that if land managers are properly educated about risks and strategies, they will develop supportive attitudes and implement appropriate control strategies. However, the social sciences have produced a large number of behavioral models and frameworks that demonstrate that knowledge transfer, by itself, fails to change behavior. The challenge then lies in knowing which behavioral model to choose, and when, from a potentially overwhelming ‘universe’. In this paper, we review nine behavior theories relevant to invasive species management. We then introduce the Behavior Change Wheel as a tool for integrating these theories into a single practical framework. This framework links drivers of and barriers to behavior change with intervention strategies and policies, in what we consider, from an applied perspective, to be an important advance.},
	urldate = {2015-08-30},
	journal = {Journal of Environmental Management},
	author = {McLeod, Lynette J. and Hine, Donald W. and Please, Patricia M. and Driver, Aaron B.},
	month = sep,
	year = {2015},
	keywords = {Behavior change wheel, Human behavioral change, Intervention design, Invasive species management, Pest management},
	pages = {63--71},
	file = {ScienceDirect Full Text PDF:files/52197/McLeod et al. - 2015 - Applying behavioral theories to invasive animal ma.pdf:application/pdf;ScienceDirect Snapshot:files/52196/McLeod et al. - 2015 - Applying behavioral theories to invasive animal ma.html:text/html}
}
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