How the Montessori Upper Elementary and Adolescent Environment Naturally Integrates Science, Mathematics, Technology, and the Environment. McNamara, J. NAMTA Journal, 41(2):83–97, 2016.
How the Montessori Upper Elementary and Adolescent Environment Naturally Integrates Science, Mathematics, Technology, and the Environment [link]Paper  abstract   bibtex   
John McNamara shares his wisdom and humbly credits Camillo Grazzini, Jenny Höglund, and David Kahn for his growth in Montessori. Recognizing more than what he has learned from his mentors, he shares the lessons he has learned from his students themselves. Math, science, history, and language are so integrated in the curriculum that students comment they don't even think whether they are doing science or math. A schedule that allows time for students to follow a query to a conclusion is vital to the kinds of discoveries John's students make, such as a shortcut for multiplying binomials or reconfiguring cubing materials that made even John marvel at student independence and innovation. A bibliography is included. [This paper was presented at the NAMTA conference titled "A Montessori Integrated Approach to Science, Mathematics, Technology, and the Environment" in Portland, OR, Mar 31-Apr 3, 2016.]
@article{mcnamara_how_2016,
	title = {How the {Montessori} {Upper} {Elementary} and {Adolescent} {Environment} {Naturally} {Integrates} {Science}, {Mathematics}, {Technology}, and the {Environment}},
	volume = {41},
	issn = {1522-9734},
	url = {https://eric.ed.gov/?id=EJ1112256},
	abstract = {John McNamara shares his wisdom and humbly credits Camillo Grazzini, Jenny Höglund, and David Kahn for his growth in Montessori. Recognizing more than what he has learned from his mentors, he shares the lessons he has learned from his students themselves. Math, science, history, and language are so integrated in the curriculum that students comment they don't even think whether they are doing science or math. A schedule that allows time for students to follow a query to a conclusion is vital to the kinds of discoveries John's students make, such as a shortcut for multiplying binomials or reconfiguring cubing materials that made even John marvel at student independence and innovation. A bibliography is included. [This paper was presented at the NAMTA conference titled "A Montessori Integrated Approach to Science, Mathematics, Technology, and the Environment" in Portland, OR, Mar 31-Apr 3, 2016.]},
	language = {eng},
	number = {2},
	journal = {NAMTA Journal},
	author = {McNamara, John},
	year = {2016},
	keywords = {Montessori Method, Educational Environment, Elementary School Students, Problem Solving, Integrated Curriculum, Montessori Schools, Mathematics, Adolescents, History, Interdisciplinary Approach, Learning Activities, Sciences, Innovation, Technology},
	pages = {83--97}
}
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