Data, Eternal. McNutt, M. Science, 347(6217):7, January, 2015.
doi  abstract   bibtex   
[Excerpt] During 2014, Science worked with members of the research community, other publishers, and representatives of funding agencies on many initiatives to increase transparency and promote reproducibility in the published research literature. Those efforts will continue in 2015. Connected to that progress, and an essential element to its success, an additional focus will be on making data more open, easier to access, more discoverable, and more thoroughly documented. My own commitment to these goals is deeply held, for I learned early in my career that interpretations come and go, but data are forever. [...] Data, particularly those collected with public funding, should be used so that they do the most good. When the greatest number of creative and insightful minds can find, access, and understand the essential features that led to the collection of a data set, the data reach their highest potential. [...] There are many publicly and privately funded data repositories worldwide, not all of which are being used to their full potential. In 2015, we want to work with authors and readers to identify which of those repositories Science should promote because they are well managed, have long-term support, and are responsive to community needs. For data that do not neatly fit into large-scale repositories, we will explore other available options. We also will evaluate different ways to tag data sets and integrate such tagging into our peer-review process.
@article{mcnuttDataEternal2015,
  title = {Data, Eternal},
  author = {McNutt, Marcia},
  year = {2015},
  month = jan,
  volume = {347},
  pages = {7},
  issn = {1095-9203},
  doi = {10.1126/science.aaa5057},
  abstract = {[Excerpt] During 2014, Science worked with members of the research community, other publishers, and representatives of funding agencies on many initiatives to increase transparency and promote reproducibility in the published research literature. Those efforts will continue in 2015. Connected to that progress, and an essential element to its success, an additional focus will be on making data more open, easier to access, more discoverable, and more thoroughly documented. My own commitment to these goals is deeply held, for I learned early in my career that interpretations come and go, but data are forever. [...] Data, particularly those collected with public funding, should be used so that they do the most good. When the greatest number of creative and insightful minds can find, access, and understand the essential features that led to the collection of a data set, the data reach their highest potential. [...] There are many publicly and privately funded data repositories worldwide, not all of which are being used to their full potential. In 2015, we want to work with authors and readers to identify which of those repositories Science should promote because they are well managed, have long-term support, and are responsive to community needs. For data that do not neatly fit into large-scale repositories, we will explore other available options. We also will evaluate different ways to tag data sets and integrate such tagging into our peer-review process.},
  journal = {Science},
  keywords = {*imported-from-citeulike-INRMM,~INRMM-MiD:c-13473628,data,data-sharing,digital-preservation,free-scientific-knowledge,knowledge-freedom,open-data,reproducibility,reproducible-research,scientific-knowledge-sharing},
  lccn = {INRMM-MiD:c-13473628},
  number = {6217}
}
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