The role of researchers in disseminating evidence to public health practice settings: a cross-sectional study. McVay, A., B., Stamatakis, K., A., Jacobs, J., A., Tabak, R., G., & Brownson, R., C. Health research policy and systems / BioMed Central, 14(1):42-44, 6, 2016.
abstract   bibtex   
BACKGROUND: Evidence-based public health interventions, which research has demonstrated offer the most promise for improving the population's health, are not always utilized in practice settings. The extent to which dissemination from researchers to public health practice settings occurs is not widely understood. This study examines the extent to which public health researchers in the United States are disseminating their research findings to local and state public health departments. METHODS: In a 2012, nationwide study, an online questionnaire was administered to 266 researchers from the National Institutes of Health, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and universities to determine dissemination practices. Logistic regression analyses were used to examine the association between dissemination to state and/or local health departments and respondent characteristics, facilitators, and barriers to dissemination. RESULTS: Slightly over half of the respondents (58%) disseminated their findings to local and/or state health departments. After adjusting for other respondent characteristics, respondents were more likely to disseminate their findings to health departments if they worked for a university Prevention Research Center or the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, or received their degree more than 20 years ago. Those who had ever worked in a practice or policy setting, those who thought dissemination was important to their own research and/or to the work of their unit/department, and those who had expectations set by their employers and/or funding agencies were more likely to disseminate after adjusting for work place, graduate degree and/or fellowship in public health, and the year the highest academic degree was received. CONCLUSIONS: There is still room for improvement in strengthening dissemination ties between researchers and public health practice settings, and decreasing the barriers researchers face during the dissemination process. Researchers could better utilize national programs or workshops, knowledge brokers, or opportunities provided through academic institutions to become more proficient in dissemination practices.
@article{
 title = {The role of researchers in disseminating evidence to public health practice settings: a cross-sectional study},
 type = {article},
 year = {2016},
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 keywords = {Barriers,Dissemination,Practice settings,Public health,Researchers},
 pages = {42-44},
 volume = {14},
 month = {6},
 day = {10},
 city = {College for Public Health and Social Justice, Saint Louis University, 3545 Lafayette Avenue, St. Louis, MO, United States of America. amayer18@slu.edu.; College for Public Health and Social Justice, Saint Louis University, 3545 Lafayette Avenue, St. Louis},
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 notes = {JID: 101170481; OTO: NOTNLM; 2015/11/22 [received]; 2016/05/19 [accepted]; 2016/06/10 [aheadofprint]; epublish},
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 abstract = {BACKGROUND: Evidence-based public health interventions, which research has demonstrated offer the most promise for improving the population's health, are not always utilized in practice settings. The extent to which dissemination from researchers to public health practice settings occurs is not widely understood. This study examines the extent to which public health researchers in the United States are disseminating their research findings to local and state public health departments. METHODS: In a 2012, nationwide study, an online questionnaire was administered to 266 researchers from the National Institutes of Health, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and universities to determine dissemination practices. Logistic regression analyses were used to examine the association between dissemination to state and/or local health departments and respondent characteristics, facilitators, and barriers to dissemination. RESULTS: Slightly over half of the respondents (58%) disseminated their findings to local and/or state health departments. After adjusting for other respondent characteristics, respondents were more likely to disseminate their findings to health departments if they worked for a university Prevention Research Center or the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, or received their degree more than 20 years ago. Those who had ever worked in a practice or policy setting, those who thought dissemination was important to their own research and/or to the work of their unit/department, and those who had expectations set by their employers and/or funding agencies were more likely to disseminate after adjusting for work place, graduate degree and/or fellowship in public health, and the year the highest academic degree was received. CONCLUSIONS: There is still room for improvement in strengthening dissemination ties between researchers and public health practice settings, and decreasing the barriers researchers face during the dissemination process. Researchers could better utilize national programs or workshops, knowledge brokers, or opportunities provided through academic institutions to become more proficient in dissemination practices.},
 bibtype = {article},
 author = {McVay, A B and Stamatakis, K A and Jacobs, J A and Tabak, R G and Brownson, R C},
 journal = {Health research policy and systems / BioMed Central},
 number = {1}
}
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