Improving quality of care and reducing unnecessary hospital admissions: a literature review. Means, T. British journal of community nursing, 21(6):284,288-291, 6, 2016.
abstract   bibtex   
As the UK population lives to older ages, with more complex health and social care needs, there comes a time when going to live in a care home might be essential for a frail, older person. Residents and their families expect high-quality care in return for the costs of their placements, but often find this is not the case ( Help the Aged, 2006 ). In order to improve quality in care homes, the Lincolnshire Community Health Services NHS Trust are piloting a care home support team. The new service aims to provide education and training to an unpredictable workforce, with the addition of regular ward rounds in care homes to ensure more proactive care for residents, in order to reduce unnecessary hospital admissions and improve the quality of care offered. This article looks at the literature relating to education and training for staff in care homes to support this service. It also aims to use the reviewed articles to identify specific training and education needed to improve quality of care for residents and reduce avoidable hospital admissions.
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 title = {Improving quality of care and reducing unnecessary hospital admissions: a literature review},
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 year = {2016},
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 keywords = {Aged,Frail Elderly,Geriatric Assessment,Great Britain,Hospitalization,Humans,Nursing Assessment,Nursing Homes,Quality Improvement,care home,education,hospital avoidance,quality,residents,training},
 pages = {284,288-291},
 volume = {21},
 month = {6},
 city = {Integrated Clinical Team Lead/Queen's Nurse, Skegness and Coastal Integrated Community Team, LCHS NHS Trust.},
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 abstract = {As the UK population lives to older ages, with more complex health and social care needs, there comes a time when going to live in a care home might be essential for a frail, older person. Residents and their families expect high-quality care in return for the costs of their placements, but often find this is not the case ( Help the Aged, 2006 ). In order to improve quality in care homes, the Lincolnshire Community Health Services NHS Trust are piloting a care home support team. The new service aims to provide education and training to an unpredictable workforce, with the addition of regular ward rounds in care homes to ensure more proactive care for residents, in order to reduce unnecessary hospital admissions and improve the quality of care offered. This article looks at the literature relating to education and training for staff in care homes to support this service. It also aims to use the reviewed articles to identify specific training and education needed to improve quality of care for residents and reduce avoidable hospital admissions.},
 bibtype = {article},
 author = {Means, T},
 journal = {British journal of community nursing},
 number = {6}
}
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