Improving a research culture in educational psychology to value transparency over novelty takes establishing new norms, grassroots advocacy, and top-down leadership. Mellor, D. T. Technical Report EdArXiv, July, 2020. 00000
Improving a research culture in educational psychology to value transparency over novelty takes establishing new norms, grassroots advocacy, and top-down leadership [link]Paper  doi  abstract   bibtex   
Many scientific disciplines are in the midst of reproducibility crisis. The cumulative harm of many seemingly modest sins are adding up to a diminished confidence in disturbingly large areas of research. These practices, which are enabled by a default towards opacity and by valuing statistical significance, impact, or novelty, undermine our credibility as a community that is expected to act in accordance with scientific ideals. Changing this reality can no longer be in the hands of the idealistic or privileged few, but must be the focus of every stakeholder in the scientific community. The field of educational psychology is well positioned to act toward this goal. This change is possible, and will transform the reproducibility crisis into a credibility revolution. It will take specific actions by both grassroots groups to build communities of practice plus the leadership of policy makers who can set standards for evaluating articles, grants, and hiring packets. These improved standards must ensure that transparency, rigor, and credibility are valued above novelty, impact, and incredibility. Grassroots groups advocate for change, share experience, and become an opportunity to create trainings so that the next generation of educational psychology researchers have the experience needed to sustain these early moves. We can take inspiration from other communities that have made shifts toward better practices, and can specifically prepare for this new world by modeling constructive evaluations of such open practices as those that take place through badging initiatives. These instances provide opportunities for emulating trail-blazers, training for new practices such as preregistration, and constructively evaluating or criticizing practice in ways that advances the reputation of all involved. This article is available as a preprint on EdArXiv:
@techreport{mellor_improving_2020,
	type = {preprint},
	title = {Improving a research culture in educational psychology to value transparency over novelty takes establishing new norms, grassroots advocacy, and top-down leadership},
	url = {https://osf.io/8tdgu},
	abstract = {Many scientific disciplines are in the midst of reproducibility crisis. The cumulative harm of many seemingly modest sins are adding up to a diminished confidence in disturbingly large areas of research. These practices, which are enabled by a default towards opacity and by valuing statistical significance, impact, or novelty, undermine our credibility as a community that is expected to act in accordance with scientific ideals. Changing this reality can no longer be in the hands of the idealistic or privileged few, but must be the focus of every stakeholder in the scientific community. The field of educational psychology is well positioned to act toward this goal. This change is possible, and will transform the reproducibility crisis into a credibility revolution. It will take specific actions by both grassroots groups to build communities of practice plus the leadership of policy makers who can set standards for evaluating articles, grants, and hiring packets. These improved standards must ensure that transparency, rigor, and credibility are valued above novelty, impact, and incredibility.  Grassroots groups advocate for change, share experience, and become an opportunity to create trainings so that the next generation of educational psychology researchers have the experience needed to sustain these early moves. We can take inspiration from other communities that have made shifts toward better practices, and can specifically prepare for this new world by modeling constructive evaluations of such open practices as those that take place through badging initiatives. These instances provide opportunities for emulating trail-blazers, training for new practices such as preregistration, and constructively evaluating or criticizing practice in ways that advances the reputation of all involved. This article is available as a preprint on EdArXiv:},
	urldate = {2020-10-02},
	institution = {EdArXiv},
	author = {Mellor, David Thomas},
	month = jul,
	year = {2020},
	doi = {10.35542/osf.io/8tdgu},
	note = {00000 },
}
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