A Study of Chief Nurse Executives Indicates Low Prioritization of Evidence-Based Practice and Shortcomings in Hospital Performance Metrics Across the United States. Melnyk, B., M., Gallagher-Ford, L., Thomas, B., K., Troseth, M., Wyngarden, K., & Szalacha, L. Worldviews on evidence-based nursing / Sigma Theta Tau International, Honor Society of Nursing, 13(1):6-14, Sigma Theta Tau International, 2, 2016.
abstract   bibtex   
BACKGROUND: Although findings from studies indicate that evidence-based practice (EBP) results in high-quality care, improved patient outcomes, and lower costs, it is not consistently implemented by healthcare systems across the United States and globe. AIMS: The purpose of this study was to describe: (a) the EBP beliefs and level of EBP implementation by chief nurse executives (CNEs), (b) CNEs' perception of their hospitals' EBP organizational culture, (c) CNEs' top priorities, (d) amount of budget invested in EBP, and (e) hospital performance metrics. METHODS: A descriptive survey was conducted. Two-hundred-seventy-six CNEs across the United States participated in the survey. Valid and reliable measures included the EBP Beliefs scale, the EBP Implementation scale, and the Organizational Culture and Readiness scale for EBP. The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services Core Measures and the National Database of Nursing Quality Indicators (NDNQI) were also collected. RESULTS: Data from this survey revealed that implementation of EBP in the practices of CNEs and their hospitals is relatively low. More than one-third of the hospitals are not meeting NDNQI performance metrics and almost one-third of the hospitals are above national core measures benchmarks, such as falls and pressure ulcers. LINKING EVIDENCE TO ACTION: Although CNEs believe that EBP results in high-quality care, it is ranked as a low priority with little budget allocation. These findings provide a plausible explanation for shortcomings in key hospital performance metrics. To achieve higher healthcare quality and safety along with decreased costs, CNEs and hospital administrators need to invest in providing resources and an evidence-based culture so that clinicians can routinely implement EBP as the foundation of care.
@article{
 title = {A Study of Chief Nurse Executives Indicates Low Prioritization of Evidence-Based Practice and Shortcomings in Hospital Performance Metrics Across the United States},
 type = {article},
 year = {2016},
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 keywords = {chief nurse,evidence-based practice,health care,nurse executive,performance metrics},
 pages = {6-14},
 volume = {13},
 month = {2},
 publisher = {Sigma Theta Tau International},
 city = {Associate Vice President for Health Promotion, University Chief Wellness Officer, Dean and Professor, College of Nursing, Professor of Pediatrics and Psychiatry, College of Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, USA.; Director, Center for Tran},
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 notes = {CI: (c) 2016; JID: 101185267; OTO: NOTNLM; 2015/08/04 [accepted]; 2016/02/01 [aheadofprint]; ppublish},
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 abstract = {BACKGROUND: Although findings from studies indicate that evidence-based practice (EBP) results in high-quality care, improved patient outcomes, and lower costs, it is not consistently implemented by healthcare systems across the United States and globe. AIMS: The purpose of this study was to describe: (a) the EBP beliefs and level of EBP implementation by chief nurse executives (CNEs), (b) CNEs' perception of their hospitals' EBP organizational culture, (c) CNEs' top priorities, (d) amount of budget invested in EBP, and (e) hospital performance metrics. METHODS: A descriptive survey was conducted. Two-hundred-seventy-six CNEs across the United States participated in the survey. Valid and reliable measures included the EBP Beliefs scale, the EBP Implementation scale, and the Organizational Culture and Readiness scale for EBP. The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services Core Measures and the National Database of Nursing Quality Indicators (NDNQI) were also collected. RESULTS: Data from this survey revealed that implementation of EBP in the practices of CNEs and their hospitals is relatively low. More than one-third of the hospitals are not meeting NDNQI performance metrics and almost one-third of the hospitals are above national core measures benchmarks, such as falls and pressure ulcers. LINKING EVIDENCE TO ACTION: Although CNEs believe that EBP results in high-quality care, it is ranked as a low priority with little budget allocation. These findings provide a plausible explanation for shortcomings in key hospital performance metrics. To achieve higher healthcare quality and safety along with decreased costs, CNEs and hospital administrators need to invest in providing resources and an evidence-based culture so that clinicians can routinely implement EBP as the foundation of care.},
 bibtype = {article},
 author = {Melnyk, B M and Gallagher-Ford, L and Thomas, B K and Troseth, M and Wyngarden, K and Szalacha, L},
 journal = {Worldviews on evidence-based nursing / Sigma Theta Tau International, Honor Society of Nursing},
 number = {1}
}
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