Current trends and new directions in crop protection. Menn, J., J. Am J Ind Med, 18(4):499-504, 1990.
abstract   bibtex   
Synthetic agricultural chemicals will continue to be the major component in protecting food and fiber crops from attack by insects, fungi, and weeds. This trend will most likely continue through the end of this century and possibly beyond. The discovery and introduction of potent new pesticides such as the sulfonylurea and imidazolinone herbicides and synthetic pyrethroid insecticides have demonstrated that excellent weed and insect control can be achieved with minute amounts of chemical per treated unit area in comparison to older chemicals. In some instances, these reductions approached two orders of magnitude. Further improvements in delivery systems and formulations have also contributed to reductions in the chemical load in the environment. However, increased regulatory demands; environmental concerns; developing resistance in key pests; increasing costs of research, development, manufacturing, and selling; and even a smaller number of basic producers, all in concert impact heavily on future developments in chemical pesticides. We can expect also that, within the next decade, there will be an increasing number of introductions of biological pesticides, including microbials and biochemicals derived from microbiological sources. These new products--including mycoherbicides, mycofungicides, and biological insecticides--are expected to become prominent control measures in the intermediate time span (10-20 years), to be supplemented in the long-term by products and transgenic plants derived from recombinant DNA technology.
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 title = {Current trends and new directions in crop protection},
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 year = {1990},
 keywords = {Baculoviridae},
 pages = {499-504},
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 abstract = {Synthetic agricultural chemicals will continue to be the major component in protecting food and fiber crops from attack by insects, fungi, and weeds. This trend will most likely continue through the end of this century and possibly beyond. The discovery and introduction of potent new pesticides such as the sulfonylurea and imidazolinone herbicides and synthetic pyrethroid insecticides have demonstrated that excellent weed and insect control can be achieved with minute amounts of chemical per treated unit area in comparison to older chemicals. In some instances, these reductions approached two orders of magnitude. Further improvements in delivery systems and formulations have also contributed to reductions in the chemical load in the environment. However, increased regulatory demands; environmental concerns; developing resistance in key pests; increasing costs of research, development, manufacturing, and selling; and even a smaller number of basic producers, all in concert impact heavily on future developments in chemical pesticides. We can expect also that, within the next decade, there will be an increasing number of introductions of biological pesticides, including microbials and biochemicals derived from microbiological sources. These new products--including mycoherbicides, mycofungicides, and biological insecticides--are expected to become prominent control measures in the intermediate time span (10-20 years), to be supplemented in the long-term by products and transgenic plants derived from recombinant DNA technology.},
 bibtype = {article},
 author = {Menn, J J},
 journal = {Am J Ind Med},
 number = {4}
}
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