Pathological inflammation in patients with COVID-19: a key role for monocytes and macrophages. Merad, M. and Martin, J. C. Nature Reviews Immunology, 20(6):355–362, June, 2020. Number: 6 Publisher: Nature Publishing Group
Pathological inflammation in patients with COVID-19: a key role for monocytes and macrophages [link]Paper  doi  abstract   bibtex   
The COVID-19 pandemic caused by infection with SARS-CoV-2 has led to more than 200,000 deaths worldwide. Several studies have now established that the hyperinflammatory response induced by SARS-CoV-2 is a major cause of disease severity and death in infected patients. Macrophages are a population of innate immune cells that sense and respond to microbial threats by producing inflammatory molecules that eliminate pathogens and promote tissue repair. However, a dysregulated macrophage response can be damaging to the host, as is seen in the macrophage activation syndrome induced by severe infections, including in infections with the related virus SARS-CoV. Here we describe the potentially pathological roles of macrophages during SARS-CoV-2 infection and discuss ongoing and prospective therapeutic strategies to modulate macrophage activation in patients with COVID-19.
@article{merad_pathological_2020,
	title = {Pathological inflammation in patients with {COVID}-19: a key role for monocytes and macrophages},
	volume = {20},
	copyright = {2020 Springer Nature Limited},
	issn = {1474-1741},
	shorttitle = {Pathological inflammation in patients with {COVID}-19},
	url = {https://www.nature.com/articles/s41577-020-0331-4},
	doi = {10.1038/s41577-020-0331-4},
	abstract = {The COVID-19 pandemic caused by infection with SARS-CoV-2 has led to more than 200,000 deaths worldwide. Several studies have now established that the hyperinflammatory response induced by SARS-CoV-2 is a major cause of disease severity and death in infected patients. Macrophages are a population of innate immune cells that sense and respond to microbial threats by producing inflammatory molecules that eliminate pathogens and promote tissue repair. However, a dysregulated macrophage response can be damaging to the host, as is seen in the macrophage activation syndrome induced by severe infections, including in infections with the related virus SARS-CoV. Here we describe the potentially pathological roles of macrophages during SARS-CoV-2 infection and discuss ongoing and prospective therapeutic strategies to modulate macrophage activation in patients with COVID-19.},
	language = {en},
	number = {6},
	urldate = {2020-06-21},
	journal = {Nature Reviews Immunology},
	author = {Merad, Miriam and Martin, Jerome C.},
	month = jun,
	year = {2020},
	note = {Number: 6
Publisher: Nature Publishing Group},
	keywords = {Monocytes, cytokine, hyperactivation, hyperinflammation, macrophages},
	pages = {355--362},
}
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