Social media institutionalization in the U.S. federal government. Mergel, I. Government Information Quarterly, 33(1):142–148, January, 2016.
Social media institutionalization in the U.S. federal government [link]Paper  doi  abstract   bibtex   
Social media adoption changes the existing organizational technology paradigm of public sector organizations. This paper explains the internal decisions that are necessary before new technologies can be used to support the strategic mission of a government organization and which behavioral and technological changes are integrated into the organization's standard operating procedures. This is an important theoretical contribution, because social media technologies are developed and hosted by third parties outside of government, with government's role limited to reactively evaluating their internal needs, strategic alignment, and existing routines. Evidence from qualitative interviews with social media directors in the U.S. federal government and a digital ethnography of their online practices expand the existing theory of social media adoption by adding two distinct activities: strategic alignment and routinization which lead to the institutionalization of new technologies.
@article{mergel_social_2016,
	title = {Social media institutionalization in the {U}.{S}. federal government},
	volume = {33},
	issn = {0740-624X},
	url = {http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0740624X15300071},
	doi = {10.1016/j.giq.2015.09.002},
	abstract = {Social media adoption changes the existing organizational technology paradigm of public sector organizations. This paper explains the internal decisions that are necessary before new technologies can be used to support the strategic mission of a government organization and which behavioral and technological changes are integrated into the organization's standard operating procedures. This is an important theoretical contribution, because social media technologies are developed and hosted by third parties outside of government, with government's role limited to reactively evaluating their internal needs, strategic alignment, and existing routines. Evidence from qualitative interviews with social media directors in the U.S. federal government and a digital ethnography of their online practices expand the existing theory of social media adoption by adding two distinct activities: strategic alignment and routinization which lead to the institutionalization of new technologies.},
	number = {1},
	urldate = {2018-03-11TZ},
	journal = {Government Information Quarterly},
	author = {Mergel, Ines},
	month = jan,
	year = {2016},
	keywords = {Social media, U.S. federal government},
	pages = {142--148}
}
Downloads: 0