Community-acquired acute kidney injury: A challenge and opportunity for primary care in kidney health. Mesropian, P. D., Othersen, J., Mason, D., Wang, J., Asif, A., & Mathew, R. O. Nephrology (Carlton, Vic.), 21(9):729–735, September, 2016.
doi  abstract   bibtex   
Community-acquired acute kidney injury (CA-AKI) has been found to be a common event in the population. Current incidence estimates are not available, but evaluations of severe elevations in serum creatinine indicate that incidence can be as high as 989 cases per million population in those older than 80 years. Data on risk factors are limited, but older age and higher comorbid illness burden, especially diabetes and cardiovascular disease, seem to be more common in patients who suffer CA-AKI. In addition to being more common than hospital-acquired AKI, the long-term sequelae of CA-AKI seem to be just as severe, including renal disease progression and mortality. Efforts to better understand the aetiology of CA-AKI and how ultimately to prevent the development of this condition will need to be taken. In the meantime, a concerted effort by general internists and nephrologists will be needed to prevent CA-AKI in the highest risk patients and thus limit the poor outcomes associated with this entity.
@article{mesropian_community-acquired_2016,
	title = {Community-acquired acute kidney injury: {A} challenge and opportunity for primary care in kidney health},
	volume = {21},
	issn = {1440-1797},
	shorttitle = {Community-acquired acute kidney injury},
	doi = {10.1111/nep.12751},
	abstract = {Community-acquired acute kidney injury (CA-AKI) has been found to be a common event in the population. Current incidence estimates are not available, but evaluations of severe elevations in serum creatinine indicate that incidence can be as high as 989 cases per million population in those older than 80 years. Data on risk factors are limited, but older age and higher comorbid illness burden, especially diabetes and cardiovascular disease, seem to be more common in patients who suffer CA-AKI. In addition to being more common than hospital-acquired AKI, the long-term sequelae of CA-AKI seem to be just as severe, including renal disease progression and mortality. Efforts to better understand the aetiology of CA-AKI and how ultimately to prevent the development of this condition will need to be taken. In the meantime, a concerted effort by general internists and nephrologists will be needed to prevent CA-AKI in the highest risk patients and thus limit the poor outcomes associated with this entity.},
	language = {eng},
	number = {9},
	journal = {Nephrology (Carlton, Vic.)},
	author = {Mesropian, Paul Der and Othersen, Jennifer and Mason, Darius and Wang, Jeffrey and Asif, Arif and Mathew, Roy O.},
	month = sep,
	year = {2016},
	pmid = {26890822},
	keywords = {Acute Kidney Injury, Evidence-Based Medicine, Humans, Incidence, Nephrology, Practice Guidelines as Topic, Prevalence, Primary Health Care, Prognosis, Risk Factors, Time Factors, acute kidney injury, adverse events, community acquired, epidemiology, renal prognosis},
	pages = {729--735}
}
Downloads: 0