Winter Survival of Female Ring-Necked Ducks in the Southern Atlantic Flyway. Mezebish, T., D.; Olsen, G., H.; Goodman, M.; Rohwer, F., C.; and McConnell, M., D. Journal of Wildlife Management, 84(8):1527-1535, 2020.
abstract   bibtex   
North American waterfowl harvest regulations are largely guided by the status of breeding populations. Nonetheless, understanding the demographics of wintering waterfowl populations can elucidate the effects of hunting pressure on population dynamics. The ring-necked duck (Aythya collaris) breeds and winters in all North American administrative flyways and is one of the most abundant and most harvested diving ducks in the Atlantic Flyway. But few studies have investigated the winter ecology of ring-necked ducks. We used a known-fate analysis to estimate period survival probability using data from 87 female ring-necked ducks marked with satellite transmitters in 2 regions of the southern Atlantic Flyway during winters of 2017–2018 and 2018–2019. Winter (128-day) survival probability was higher for individuals in the Red Hills region of southern Georgia and northern Florida (0.875, 95% CI = 0.691–0.952) than individuals in central South Carolina (0.288, 95% CI = 0.082–0.514). We attribute the regional disparity in winter survival probabilities to differences in hunting pressure, which are reflected in the number of harvests we observed in each region. Our findings warrant further investigation into regional variation in winter survival of southern Atlantic Flyway ring-necked ducks, and, specifically, the relationship between variable harvest pressure and winter survival and its influence on ring-necked duck population dynamics and adaptive harvest management decisions. © 2020 The Wildlife Society.
@article{
 title = {Winter Survival of Female Ring-Necked Ducks in the Southern Atlantic Flyway},
 type = {article},
 year = {2020},
 identifiers = {[object Object]},
 keywords = {Aythya collaris,Red Hills region,South Carolina,ring-necked duck,satellite telemetry,southern Atlantic Flyway,survival probability,winter},
 pages = {1527-1535},
 volume = {84},
 id = {45962455-9f15-3277-ab91-dc9cbe9e6ca0},
 created = {2020-11-20T15:48:03.877Z},
 file_attached = {true},
 profile_id = {91ad88dc-f53f-3c07-a2fb-dff94290c6c6},
 group_id = {3addd0f7-d578-34d3-be80-24022cc062a1},
 last_modified = {2020-11-20T15:50:30.049Z},
 read = {true},
 starred = {false},
 authored = {false},
 confirmed = {true},
 hidden = {false},
 private_publication = {false},
 abstract = {North American waterfowl harvest regulations are largely guided by the status of breeding populations. Nonetheless, understanding the demographics of wintering waterfowl populations can elucidate the effects of hunting pressure on population dynamics. The ring-necked duck (Aythya collaris) breeds and winters in all North American administrative flyways and is one of the most abundant and most harvested diving ducks in the Atlantic Flyway. But few studies have investigated the winter ecology of ring-necked ducks. We used a known-fate analysis to estimate period survival probability using data from 87 female ring-necked ducks marked with satellite transmitters in 2 regions of the southern Atlantic Flyway during winters of 2017–2018 and 2018–2019. Winter (128-day) survival probability was higher for individuals in the Red Hills region of southern Georgia and northern Florida (0.875, 95% CI = 0.691–0.952) than individuals in central South Carolina (0.288, 95% CI = 0.082–0.514). We attribute the regional disparity in winter survival probabilities to differences in hunting pressure, which are reflected in the number of harvests we observed in each region. Our findings warrant further investigation into regional variation in winter survival of southern Atlantic Flyway ring-necked ducks, and, specifically, the relationship between variable harvest pressure and winter survival and its influence on ring-necked duck population dynamics and adaptive harvest management decisions. © 2020 The Wildlife Society.},
 bibtype = {article},
 author = {Mezebish, Tori D. and Olsen, Glenn H. and Goodman, Michele and Rohwer, Frank C. and McConnell, Mark D.},
 journal = {Journal of Wildlife Management},
 number = {8}
}
Downloads: 0